Africa

2014

Alerts   |   Somalia

Somali authorities detain two radio directors without charge

Mohamed Barre after detention (SIMHA)

Nairobi, February 14, 2014--The Committee to Protect Journalists is gravely concerned by reports that two radio directors in the capital, Mogadishu, were arrested and held without charge for two days by Somalia's National Security Agency. 

Somalia authorities detained two radio directors for two days and threatened to kill them if they continued to air news critical of the government upon their release, local journalists told CPJ. On Tuesday evening, National Security agents arrested the directors of two independent radio stations, Mohamed Barre and Ibrahim Mohamed from Radio Danan and Radio Haatuf, respectively, according to news reports and local journalists. They were released from a detention center Thursday night without charge, according to the same sources. Mohamed and Ibrahim were beaten in custody, a colleague who spoke to the journalists told CPJ.

February 14, 2014 12:22 PM ET

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Attacks on the Press   |   Cambodia, USA

Without Stronger Transparency, More Financial Crises Loom

The recent financial meltdown should be treated as a lesson on the importance of information transparency and the crucial role of a free press. By Michael J. Casey

Sharp swings in the stock market have led to questions about who stands to benefit from high-frequency trading. (AP/Richard Drew)

Attacks on the Press

Attacks on the Press in 2013: Africa

Front-line reports and analytical essays by CPJ experts cover an array of topics of critical importance to journalists. Governments store transactional data and the content of journalists' communications. Media and money engage in a tug of war, with media owners reluctant to draw China's disfavor and advertisers able to wield surprising clout. In Syria, journalists are determined to distribute the news amid the chaos of conflict. In Vietnam, the government makes a heavy-handed bid to bring the Internet under control. And globally, eliminating witnesses has become an all too easy method of stymying justice when journalists are assassinated.

February 12, 2014 2:14 AM ET

Attacks on the Press   |   Ethiopia, Nigeria, Rwanda, South Africa

Pressure on Journalists Rises Along With Africa's Prospects

After a decade of unprecedented growth and development, the insistence on positive news remains a significant threat to press freedom in sub-Saharan Africa. By Mohamed Keita

A newspaper displayed in the Ikoyi district of Lagos on September 30, 2013, tells of a deadly attack on a college in northeast Nigeria by suspected Boko Haram militants. Coverage of the group can be sensitive in Nigeria. (Reuters/Akintunde Akinleye)
A newspaper displayed in the Ikoyi district of Lagos on September 30, 2013, tells of a deadly attack on a college in northeast Nigeria by suspected Boko Haram militants. Coverage of the group can be sensitive in Nigeria. (Reuters/Akintunde Akinleye)

Attacks on the Press   |   Kenya, South Sudan, Tanzania, Uganda

Advertising and Censorship in East Africa's Press

The printed word is thriving in parts of Africa, but advertisers' clout means they can often quietly control what is published. By Tom Rhodes

Kenyans read election coverage in the Mathare slum in Nairobi, the capital, on March 9, 2013. One reason that advertising revenue trumps circulation for East Africa's newspapers is that readers often share papers to save money. (Reuters/Goran Tomasevic)
Kenyans read election coverage in the Mathare slum in Nairobi, the capital, on March 9, 2013. One reason that advertising revenue trumps circulation for East Africa's newspapers is that readers often share papers to save money. (Reuters/Goran Tomasevic)

Attacks on the Press   |   South Africa

Mandela's Legacy of Media Freedom Stands Its Ground

How robust are the institutional safeguards that underpin Nelson Mandela's vision of a strong and independent South African media? By Sue Valentine

Nelson Mandela, pictured in May 2011, sometimes accused critical black journalists of disloyalty during his presidency.  (AFP/Elmond Jiyane)
Nelson Mandela, pictured in May 2011, sometimes accused critical black journalists of disloyalty during his presidency. (AFP/Elmond Jiyane)

2014

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