Americas

Attacks on the Press   |   Egypt, France, Greece, Pakistan, Paraguay, Syria

Foreword

In Pakistan, an unknown gunman shoots a news anchor multiple times. No one is arrested for the crime, though arrest warrants are issued against the journalist--for his reporting.

Attacks on the Press   |   Mexico, Nigeria, Syria

Broadcasting murder: Militants use media for deadly purpose

A militant uses a mobile phone to film fellow Islamic State fighters taking part in a military parade along the streets of Syria's Raqqa province on June 30, 2014. (Reuters/Stringer)

News of the August 19, 2014, murder of journalist James Foley broke not in the media but instead on Twitter. News organizations faced the agonizing questions of how to report on the killing and what portions of the video to show. If a group or individual commits an act of violence, and then films it, how can traditional news organizations cover it without amplifying the propaganda message?

Attacks on the Press   |   Mexico, Pakistan

Between conflict and stability: Journalists in Pakistan and Mexico cope with everyday threats

By Daniel DeFraia

Mexican journalists hold photos of killed colleagues during a demonstration in Mexico City on February 23, 2014, against kidnapping and murder of Veracruz reporter Gregorio Jimenez de la Cruz. (Reuters/Henry Romero)

The Pakistani journalist knew the risk, but he wrote the story about the militants anyway. Years earlier he had been shot, after reporting on another taboo subject, but for him the freelance work was thrilling, even after he had to marry his girlfriend in secret and flee Pakistan without her--and still now, since the nightmares began.

Attacks on the Press   |   Canada, UK, USA

Surveillance forces journalists to think and act like spies

Graffiti attributed to the street artist Banksy is seen near the offices of Britain's eavesdropping agency, Government Communications Headquarters, or GCHQ, in Cheltenham, England, on April 16, 2014. (Reuters/Eddie Keogh)

Once upon a time, a journalist never gave up a confidential source. When someone comes forward, anonymously, to inform the public, it's better to risk time incarcerated than give them up. This ethical responsibility was also a practical and professional necessity. If you promise anonymity, you're obliged to deliver. If you can't keep your word, who will trust you in the future? Sources go elsewhere and stories pass you by.

Attacks on the Press   |   Spain, USA

Two continents, two courts, two approaches to privacy

Mario Costeja Gonzalez speaks on his mobile phone outside a court in Barakaldo, Spain, on June 25, 2013. As a result of a lawsuit he filed against Google, Internet companies can be made to remove irrelevant or excessive personal information from search engine results, Europe's top court ruled.  (Reuters/Vincent West)

At 3:20 a.m. on August 24, 2014, the strongest earthquake in a quarter-century rocked the San Francisco Bay Area, causing damage widely estimated at between $300 million and $1 billion.

Attacks on the Press   |   China, Cuba, Eritrea, Hungary, Iran, Poland, South Africa, Sudan, Syria, Vietnam

Journalists overcome obstacles through crowdfunding and determination

The rubble of a school bombed by the Sudanese government in 2012. To set up a news agency to cover the conflict, humanitarian worker Ryan Boyette used crowdfunding. (AP/Ryan Boyette)

During South Africa's Boer War, at the turn of the 20th century, a determined news organization relocated reporters, copy editors, and printing presses to the front line to ensure accurate reporting. In the Warsaw Ghetto, during World War II, a literal underground press, established to counter Nazi propaganda, required the nightly movement of cumbersome printing equipment to evade capture.

Alerts   |   Brazil

CPJ condemns harassment of journalists in Brazil

São Paulo, April 22, 2015--The Committee to Protect Journalists condemns the harassment of journalists reporting on corruption in the Brazilian state of Paraná and calls on authorities to ensure their safety. A Brazilian journalist has gone into hiding after receiving death threats, while at least four others from a daily news outlet said they have been constantly harassed by police, according to the reporters and their employers.

Letters   |   Mexico

CPJ to Mexican president: case of jailed journalist violates free expression

Dear President Peña Nieto: The Committee to Protect Journalists is writing to express its concern at the continued detention of an independent journalist and Mayan activist in the Mexican state of Quintana Roo. Pedro Celestino Canché Herrera has been imprisoned since August 30, 2014, when he was arrested by state security forces and charged with sabotage.

April 20, 2015 12:24 PM ET

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