Haiti

2010


Blog   |   China, Egypt, Haiti, Pakistan, Russia, Security, USA

Global Media Forum cites risks of environmental reporting

Fishermen on the Nile, where chemical dumping has been reported. (AP/Ben Curtis) He's young,
unemployed and carries himself with the innocence of a man who hasn't spent
much time outside his own village. But Egyptian blogger Tamer
Mabrouk
is the real deal. Appearing at an international media conference in Bonn, Mabrouk's description of chemical dumping into a
brackish lagoon on the northern Nile Delta near the Mediterranean Sea was
punctuated by photos of unmistakable filth. He won over the audience when, in
response to a question on how one travels with sensitive material, Tamer deftly
removed a memory card secreted in an electronic device and held it in the air.
That, he said, is where he had carried documents for this trip.

Blog   |   Haiti, Journalist Assistance, USA

Starting from scratch: A Haitian journalist exiled in the U.S.

CheryI arrived in New York in April 2003. It was cold.

The streets of Brooklyn seemed too wide to me and the buildings huge. The number 3 train would pass over and over again like a luminous monster. From the window of my apartment, I would watch this train go by. I would also watch people walk without speaking to one another. My days were monotonous and nightmares invaded my nights. I recalled vividly how in Haiti my family and I were threatened with death several times, culminating in an evening when unidentified gunmen targeted my house. In the days after that, they assaulted and attacked other journalists working for the same media outlet as me. Such heinous acts haunted my dreams.

I went into exile.

June 17, 2010 11:47 AM ET

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Blog   |   Haiti

Media center in Haiti has become 'anchor point' for press

Three months after it opened, Haitian journalists are still benefitting from the wide-ranging services provided by the Media Operations Center, which has provided a workspace for journalists after the earthquake. While radio stations based in the capital are back on the air, the long power cuts and problems accessing the Internet are still prompting journalists to seek refuge at the center, said local veteran journalist Yves Marie Chanel. He called it “an essential anchor point for local journalists and those working for international media outlets in Haiti.”
April 9, 2010 1:10 PM ET

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Blog   |   Haiti

Media in Leogane devastated

Of the 12 radio stations in the city Leogane, south of Haiti’s capital, Port-au-Prince, only five are back on the air more than two months after the earthquake. Most stations were seriously damaged and several broadcasters are struggling to restore transmission, the head of the Leogane Press Association (APL), Julmane Saint Fort, told CPJ. Saint Fort said that six radio stations were completely destroyed and five severely damaged while the rest suffered some minor material harm.
March 23, 2010 5:12 PM ET

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Blog   |   Haiti

Haiti’s only Creole newspaper is out of business

Haiti’s sole newspaper published exclusively in Creole has disappeared under the rubble of the January 12 earthquake. The Port-au-Prince offices of the monthly Bon Nouvel (Good News) were destroyed, as were the facilities of its La Phalange printing unit, which specialized in the production of Creole-language books and documents. 

March 16, 2010 2:19 PM ET

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Blog   |   Haiti

For Haitian media, a big story amid big demands

A tent city in the hard-hit town of Leogane. Journalists are among those living in such temporary shelters. (AP/Rodrigo Abd)

In the aftermath of the January 12 earthquake, Kerby Joseph stays on the job. He helps gather news for Amikal FM, a radio station that now broadcasts from a tent in the devastated Haitian town of Leogane, where most of the buildings have been damaged or destroyed. But the radio station lacks the money to pay Joseph's salary. So ever since the disaster, Joseph works for free, retiring at the end of the day to a camp where he shares a makeshift, tin-roofed shelter with 10 other people “I haven't been paid anything—not a cent,” Joseph said. “We just keep working for the community. Quite simply, that's why we do this.”

March 12, 2010 4:29 PM ET

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Blog   |   Haiti

Journalists fleeing Haiti in aftermath of quake

Thousands of Haitians, including many journalists, have fled the country since the January 12 earthquake. Ronald Leon, a veteran journalist who worked with Haiti’s National Television station, Radio Caraibes and Tropic FM, has now settled in Florida, leaving behind his family and his journalism training school, Ameritech, which was destroyed in the earthquake. Its last class had 15 students.

Blog   |   France, Haiti, USA

French weekly gives issue over to Haitian journalists

Courrier International

The French weekly Courrier International opened its columns on February 4 to Haitian print media journalists in a special edition being circulated worldwide. The paper’s managers did it to express solidarity with Haitian journalists following the earthquake, which completely paralyzed the publication of the country’s dailies.

The two dailies in Haiti’s capital, Port-au-PrinceLe Nouvelliste and Le Matin, were honored in the special edition. Haiti Liberté, a Haitian weekly based in BrooklynNew York, also participated. 
March 4, 2010 12:21 PM ET

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Blog   |   Haiti

Radio Lumière in Haiti loses three journalists in quake

Radio Lumière has officially published the names of three of its journalists who died in the January 12 earthquake in Haiti: Jude Marcellus, Marlene Joseph, and Ginord Desplumes. They died under the rubble of collapsed buildings. It took a month for Radio Lumière officials to decide to publish the names of the three victims.
February 26, 2010 2:27 PM ET

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Blog   |   Haiti

Haiti's online news agencies barely functioning

The three main online news agencies in Port-au-Prince, the Haitian capital, are struggling in the aftermath of the quake. Clarens Renois, the founding director of Haiti Press Network, addressed the outlet's future frankly: “In three months, I will close the agency,” he said. 

February 17, 2010 12:45 PM ET

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Blog   |   Haiti

CPJ support helps an injured Haitian reporter

His collarbone severely fractured in the January 12 earthquake, Haitian journalist Yves Adler Boissonniere needed considerable medical attention—care that he could not get in his devastated country. With US$40 and a few gourdes (Haiti’s currency) in his pocket, Boissonniere decided in late January to cross the border to the Dominican Republic in hopes of getting care. Yet his situation remained exceedingly difficult: A few dollars could not pay for the X-rays, examinations, and treatment he needed. This week, Boissonniere’s prospects brightened when he received grants from international organizations, including CPJ, that will allow him to seek immediate care.

February 12, 2010 5:32 PM ET

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Blog   |   Haiti

Provisional media death toll rising in Haiti

Outside their wrecked headquarters, Radio Caraibe's presenters broadcast from a makeshift studio in Port-au-Prince. (Reuters) A month after the January 12 earthquake, the death toll for journalists has risen to 26, with two others injured, according to a new provisional tally released by media groups in Haiti. Under the umbrella of International Media Support, a joint mission of press groups (including the Association of Haitian Journalists, SOS Journalistes, and the Group for Reflection and Action for Freedom of the Press) visited Leogane, Petit Goave, and Grand Goave on Friday—the areas most devastated by the disaster—to try to get a better sense of the number of journalists killed. CPJ continues to investigate the number of deaths from the quake.

Blog   |   Haiti

Internews provides critical news to use in Haiti

A Haitian refugee in a Port-au-Prince camp listens to the radio. (AP)

Every evening, between 9 and 10 p.m., people in areas affected by the January 12 earthquake listen to the program “Nouvel pou nou Konnen” (News to Know). Huddled in tents or sitting in the open air, men and women cling to their transistor radios to get news on the latest decisions of the Haitian government or agencies coordinating international assistance in affected areas. The program comes via the California-based media development agency Internews, which opened a press center in the Haitian capital, Port-au-Prince, in order to bridge the information gap following the destruction of most media outlets in this city.

February 8, 2010 12:57 PM ET

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Blog   |   Haiti

Radio Metropole: A station in Haiti running out of steam

Radio Metropole’s staff have lost their homes, and the station has lost 80 percent of its advertisers since the quake.

Radio Metropole’s journalists, coping in a tent set up in the garden of the radio station’s office in Port-au-Prince, have not still resumed their normal pace of work because of the trauma caused by the January 12 earthquake. The station resumed its normal programming on February 1, after broadcasting news via the Internet for two weeks. 

February 3, 2010 3:25 PM ET

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Blog   |   Haiti

Journalist Marcus Garcia pushes onward in Haiti's chaos

Amid Haiti’s chaos, Marcus Garcia struggles every day to fulfill his duty as journalist. He said he routinely goes up and down the streets of Port-au-Prince in search of fuel for his car. When talking on the phone, the tone of his voice indicates the difficulties he encounters as a journalist willing to keep doing his job in the aftermath of the January 12 earthquake. Garcia feels the toll as heavily as anyone right now: He lost his wife in the disaster.
February 2, 2010 5:49 PM ET

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Blog   |   Haiti

Videos show Haiti's community radio stations in ruins

As CPJ’s Haiti consultant Jean Roland Chery wrote Wednesday on the CPJ Blog, “Community radio stations play a leading role in local news coverage in Haiti’s most remote communities, filling the void left by private radio stations in the capital.” Today we can show you two videos clearly depicting the devastation to the Haitian local radio community after the earthquake.

February 2, 2010 2:37 PM ET

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Blog   |   Haiti

Media must not be left behind as Haiti rebuilds

Foreign journalists, seen here working in Port-au-Prince, have flooded into Haiti after the earthquake, but the local media is in tatters. (Reuters/Eliana Aponte) The earthquake that rocked Haiti didn't spare anyone, including the media. Like every institution in the troubled country, the media has had its share of challenges. They cannot pay decent salaries to reporters and the reporting most often doesn't go beyond the headlines. International organizations have developed training programs for Haitian journalists, but those journalists tend to leave Haiti after gaining some experiences, leaving a vicious brain drain and a permanent training cycle.

February 1, 2010 10:57 AM ET

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Blog   |   Haiti

Haiti’s Radio Tele Caraïbes lost its offices, not its mission

Radio Tele Caraïbes is out on the street after losing the use of its offices in the January 12 earthquake, but the Port-au-Prince broadcaster has resumed operations nonetheless. A makeshift newsroom has been set up in a tent in the middle of a street. Staff meetings and discussions are being held under the gaze of passersby. Reports are being prepared without production studios, and technicians are making do with damaged equipment. The broadcaster has faced numerous challenges in its 60-year history, but none as extraordinary as those being posed in the earthquake’s aftermath.

January 28, 2010 3:23 PM ET

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Blog   |   Haiti

Community radio stations obliterated, off the air in Haiti

Women sell fruit in Jacmel, where Radio Fondwa was completely destroyed along with much of the city’s downtown. (AP)

More than two weeks after earthquake that devastated Haiti, several community radio stations are still off the air. In the western and southeastern parts of the country, at least 16 stations are facing serious problems that have suspended their broadcasts, Sony Esteus, executive director of SAKS, a local organization of community radio stations, told CPJ. The earthquake obliterated SAKS’ office in the Bourdon neighborhood, east of Port-au-Prince.

January 27, 2010 1:57 PM ET

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Blog   |   Haiti

Haitian media casualties, damages mount

Working in an atmosphere of great confusion and grief, our sources in Haiti are compiling preliminary lists of media casualties, documenting damages to news facilities, and examining the challenges ahead. SOS Journalistes, a press advocacy group led by the prominent Haitian journalist Guyler Delva, reports that at least 11 journalists died in the January 12 earthquake outside Port-au-Prince. CPJ continues to investigate their identities and the circumstances in which they died.

January 26, 2010 4:34 PM ET

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Blog   |   Haiti

For Haiti’s Michele Montas, trauma and determination

Michele Montas, the Haitian journalist and former spokeswoman for U.N. Secretary- General Ban Ki-moon, has experienced a harrowing time in aftermath of the Haitian earthquake. “Haiti appears to be on doomsday,” said Montas, who said she has been shaken by the number of dead and wounded on the streets of the capital, Port-au-Prince. Her own home suffered only minor damage, Montas said, adding that that she intends to stay in Haiti for a prolonged period to help her country through the crisis.
January 25, 2010 12:30 PM ET

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Blog   |   Haiti

In Haiti, initial media toll is released

Destruction in Port-au-Prince. (AP/Rodrigo Abd) The Association of Haitian Journalists has recorded at least three media fatalities and one seriously wounded journalist as a preliminary toll from the earthquake that struck the Caribbean island on January 12. In an interview with CPJ from Port-au-Prince, AJH Secretary General Jacques Desrosiers identified the early victims as Wanel Fils, a reporter with Radio Galaxie; Henry Claude Pierre, a Jacmel-based correspondent for Radio Magic 9; and Belot Senatus, a cameraman for Radio Tele Guinen.

January 24, 2010 10:57 AM ET

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Blog   |   Haiti

In Haiti, Signal FM staff keeps station running

In the studios of Signal FM this week. (AP/Ariana Cubillos)

Signal FM is the only Haitian radio station to continuously broadcast during and after the powerful 7.0-magnitude earthquake that ravaged the capital, Port-au-Prince, and surrounding areas on January 12. Signal’s online news service kept operating as well. The station’s equipment, located in Petionville (east of Port-au-Prince) remained in service, withstanding, remarkably, tremors to the building and broadcasting aerials. But the true credit goes to the station’s staff members, who made extraordinary efforts and great sacrifices to inform the public during a period of chaos, the station’s managing director, Mario Viau, told CPJ.

January 21, 2010 11:33 AM ET

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Blog   |   Haiti, Journalist Assistance

How to help journalists in Haiti

A man sits amid the rubble in Port-au-Prince. (AP)

The scenes from Port-au-Prince are horrifying, and the needs are staggering. There is no food, no water, no place to bury the dead. And there is also no information. According to CPJ’s Senior Americas Program Coordinator Carlos Lauria, who spoke with Haitian journalist Guylar Delva today, only a handful of Creole-language radio stations are operating. Journalists are unable to work because they have been personally devastated—their homes have collapsed or their loved ones have died. 

January 15, 2010 2:25 PM ET

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Blog   |   Haiti

Haitian journalist describes scenes of death and destruction

At 5 p.m. on Tuesday, prominent Haitian journalist Joseph Guyler Delva, 43, was driving his car on the streets of Port-au-Prince. Delva, the country’s leading press freedom advocate, was on his way to pick-up his 7-year-old daughter from school when he heard a loud bang. “I thought I was hit by a truck,” he said. After few moments, he realized it was not a collision. The earth shook beneath him, buildings collapsed in front of him, and in a minute, a great wall of dust fully covered the capital.

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