Asia

2010

Alerts   |   Pakistan

Journalists in Pakistan remain under threat

New York, October 25, 2010--Pakistan must take immediate steps to rein in police and government agencies that threaten reporters. Two cases in recent days--those of journalists Hafiz Imran and Umar Cheema--demonstrate how reporting on stories that are critical of the authorities can bring officials' wrath down on reporters.

Alerts   |   Vietnam

A wave of media suppression in Vietnam

New York, October 22, 2010--CPJ is concerned by Vietnamese authorities' recent crackdown against several bloggers and one print journalist.

Blog   |   India, Internet, Russia, South Korea, UK

Internet blotter

October 22, 2010 4:18 PM ET

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Alerts   |   Burma

Burmese editor sentenced to 13 years in prison

Bangkok, October 22, 2010--The Committee to Protect Journalists condemns the 13-year prison sentence handed down last week by a Burmese court to Nyi Nyi Tun, editor of the Kandarawaddy news publication.
October 22, 2010 12:27 PM ET

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Blog   |   China, India, Internet, Pakistan, Russia, Saudi Arabia, UAE

Use your Blackberry to map global surveillance

The University of Toronto's Citizen Lab has announced a research project to analyze the global infrastructure of Research In Motion, maker of the BlackBerry. It's looking for BlackBerry users from any country to take part--especially those in the United Arab Emirates, Saudi Arabia, India, Indonesia, Russia and China.

All of these countries have at some point demanded that RIM make their BlackBerry network more surveillance-friendly. Some have threatened to ban BlackBerry services outright if their demands are not met. Other reports suggest that RIM has made concessions to some of these countries' demands.

One possible concession RIM might make is to move its Blackberry Internet Service (BIS) servers to locations within those countries' jurisdictions. BIS servers are the bridges between the internal BlackBerry network and the wider Internet. A locally-hosted BIS server would make it easier for domestic security services to monitor BlackBerry users' general Web traffic.

RIM has kept quiet about what agreements, if any, it has made with any government. Nevertheless, it is theoretically possible to work out the location of these BIS servers externally. If you're a journalist who uses a BlackBerry, all you have to do to help with this project is to visit the RimCheck website using your BlackBerry device and fill out a short form. The site will record the IP address of the machine your request comes from, and will attempt to determine where in the world that server could be located.

The conclusions that the RIM Check project draws from this study will be published when the group has collected enough data. Concrete statistics like this will mean we'll finally be able to see if BlackBerry's send their data exclusively through Canadian servers as some believe or whether RIM has distributed these servers globally--potentially allowing users' unencrypted Net traffic to be as monitorable as that sent through a local Internet service provider.
October 21, 2010 5:27 PM ET

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Blog   |   Bahrain, Internet, Iran, Thailand, USA

Internet blotter

October 20, 2010 4:58 PM ET

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Blog   |   China, Egypt, Internet, Iran, Pakistan

Internet Blotter

October 19, 2010 2:38 PM ET

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Reports   |   China

In China, a debate on press rights

Chinese journalists are speaking out more often to protest attacks, harassment, and arrests. The discussion of press rights—and the central government’s stance—may foretell the future of broader reforms in China. A CPJ special report by Madeline Earp

Chinese journalists, seen here at a police roadblock, are contesting harassment more publicly. (AP)

Blog   |   CPJ

Asia program now on Facebook, Twitter

Until now, CPJ's Asia program has relied largely on email blasts to get the word out when we post something new on CPJ.org. Today we launched our Facebook and Twitter pages. Like us and follow us for an inside look at the Asia program and quick, timely updates on our alerts and blogs. We also hope you'll take the opportunity to interact with each other on these social networks.

October 18, 2010 2:58 PM ET

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Blog   |   China

In China, more calls for media freedom

Premier Wen Jiabao says freedom will be "irresistable" in China, although the government censored his remarks. (AP/Yves Logghe)

Today, members of China's Communist Party Central Committee met in Beijing to open a three-day discussion on the country's next five-year development plan. And while they're unlikely to openly debate a recent letter by 23 senior Party members, which called for sweeping reforms of China's media censorship policies, it will certainly be in the air.

October 15, 2010 4:24 PM ET

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