China

2014


Alerts   |   China

Critical Chinese writer Tie Liu arrested, home raided

New York, September 15, 2014--Police raided the home of a critical Chinese writer and publisher on Sunday, and detained him on a charge of "picking quarrels and provoking trouble," according to his family and news reports. Huang Zerong, 81, had recently written articles criticizing restrictions on press freedom in China, according to news reports.

September 15, 2014 3:30 PM ET

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Blog   |   China

Conditions increasingly restrictive for foreign correspondents in China

When China hosted the summer Olympics in 2008 it promised greater press freedom, but six years later conditions for international journalists are increasingly more restrictive, as evidenced by a report released today by the Foreign Correspondents' Club of China.

Alerts   |   China

Chinese journalist dismissed after writing on Hong Kong news website

New York, July 22, 2014--The Committee to Protect Journalists is concerned by the recent termination of a Chinese journalist from a monthly magazine after he wrote for a Hong Kong website. Song Zhibiao's dismissal marks the first publicized case of its kind following recent directives by the Chinese government that bar journalists from cooperating with foreign news agencies, according to The New York Times.

Case   |   China

China releases journalists from prison

As in past years, China in 2014 arrested some journalists and activists in the run-up to the anniversary of the massacre of protesters in Tiananmen Square on June 4, 1989. This year, journalists were also arrested in possible connection to an ongoing police probe into prominent human rights lawyer Pu Zhiqiang and for reporting on protests that took place in Beijing in March. By July 2014, CPJ had documented the arrests of at least 9 journalists since the beginning of the year. Of those, four were subsequently released.

Blog   |   China

Ever broader restrictions handed down for China's reporters

Yet another set of rules restricting the work of journalists in China takes the concept of "overbroad" to new heights. According to guidelines made public Tuesday by the official state news agency Xinhua, the new rules cover various "information, materials, and news products that journalists may deal with during their work, including state secrets, commercial secrets, and unpublicized information."

Alerts   |   China

China puts Tibetan writer and husband under house arrest amid Kerry visit

Tibetan writer Tsering Woeser, seen here in a 2008 photo, has been placed under house arrest along with her husband, author Wang Lixiong. (AP/Ng Han Guan)

New York, July 9, 2014--Chinese authorities should immediately release two writers who have been placed under house arrest in Beijing, the Committee to Protect Journalists said today. The move comes as China hosts U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry.

Case   |   China

Tibetan writers released from prison in China

Two Tibetan writers were released from prison in Sichuan province on June 20, 2014, after completing four-year jail terms given to them in June 2010, according to reports. Jangtse Donkho and Buddha were convicted in the Aba Intermediate Court on charges of "incitement to split the nation," reports said.

Statements   |   China

CPJ concerned by new restrictions on journalists in China

New York, June 18, 2014--China's State Administration of Press, Publication, Radio, Film and Television issued a circular today that, if fully implemented, will curtail Chinese journalists' ability to report. News of the directive came via the official state news agency, Xinhua.

Blog   |   China

Conditions for international reporters deteriorating in China

The Foreign Correspondents' Club of China released at the end of May its annual report on conditions for international journalists working in the country. As we have done in the past, we're posting this year's report as a PDF. The takeaway is that conditions have certainly not gotten better and many feel they have gotten worse, according to the 123 respondents to the survey, slightly more than half of its membership of 236.

Statements   |   China

CPJ welcomes release of Tibetan filmmaker Dhondup Wangchen in China

New York, June 5, 2014--The Committee to Protect Journalists welcomes the release today of Tibetan documentary filmmaker Dhondup Wangchen, who was jailed in China in 2008 for shooting the film, "Leaving Fear Behind," which documents conditions faced by Tibetans under Chinese rule. Wangchen was released from prison in Qinghai's provincial capital, Xining, today, but faces an unspecified term of deprivation of political rights, according to Wangpo Tethong, a member of the Switzerland-based Tibetan film company Filming for Tibet who spoke to CPJ. 

Alerts   |   China

China detains journalist amid widening crackdown

Hong Kong, May 29, 2014--Another journalist has been detained in China ahead of the 25th anniversary of the Tiananmen Square crackdown, according to news reports. The Committee to Protect Journalists condemns the detention of Xin Jian, who was arrested on May 13 and accused of "picking quarrels and provoking trouble."

Alerts   |   China

Boxun News contributor arrested in China

Hong Kong, May 14, 2014--Chinese authorities said on Tuesday that police arrested a contributor to the U.S.-based Chinese-language news website Boxun News on May 3, accusing him of fabricating stories that harmed China's image, according to news reports. The Committee to Protect Journalists condemns Xiang Nanfu's arrest, which is the latest in a wave of detention of dissidents, including lawyers, professors, and journalists, in the run-up to the 25th anniversary of Tiananmen Square.

Blog   |   China

Ilham Tohti's daughter fights for his freedom

At first glance, 19-year-old Jewher Ilham may seem like a typical college student. As she clutched her smart phone, the face of a cat imprinted on the cover peered through her fingers. She spoke in short sentences with little pause. Her thoughts pulled her in various directions as she spoke about her love for dance, juggling parental expectations, and what she has learned to cook during her past year in a small college town in the U.S.

May 8, 2014 3:23 PM ET

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Alerts   |   China

Chinese journalist Gao Yu jailed for leaking secrets

A 2007 photo shows Chinese journalist Gao Yu speaking in Hong Kong. Gao has been detained since April 24. (AFP/Mike Clarke)

Hong Kong, May 8, 2014--A Chinese journalist missing since April 24 was detained by authorities and has been accused of leaking a confidential Communist Party document, according to news reports. Gao Yu's arrest comes amid the detention of several government critics as the 25th anniversary of the Tiananmen Square crackdown approaches, according to news reports

Reports   |   Azerbaijan, Bahrain, China, Egypt, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Iran, Turkey, Uzbekistan, Vietnam

Ten journalists to free from prison

On World Press Freedom Day,
CPJ calls for the release of all jailed journalists


Al-Jazeera journalist Peter Greste is in prison in Egypt on charges of supporting the Muslim Brotherhood. (AFP/Khaled Desouki)

By Shazdeh Omari/CPJ News Editor

New York, April 29, 2014—Uzbek editor Muhammad Bekjanov has been in jail for 15 years, one of the longest imprisonments of journalists worldwide. Prominent Iranian journalist Siamak Ghaderi was imprisoned in 2010 and has been beaten and whipped in custody. Vietnamese blogger Nguyen Van Hai, serving a 12-year jail term, could barely walk or talk during a prison visit in July 2013, his family said.

Blog   |   China

Chinese journalist Gao Yu is missing

Gao Yu (VOA)

On April 15, 1989, Hu Yaobang died. Hu had been general secretary of the Communist Party from 1982 to 1987, and recognized for his leanings toward economic reform in China. His death led to demonstrations around China, some of them in Tiananmen Square. On June 4, 1989, Tiananmen became the focus of the government's wrath, and in the intersections of the broad streets around the plaza, the government cracked down brutally. Since then, it has been a government tradition to start cracking down on protesters, critics, and dissidents before April 15, and this year is no different. China watchers say the strictures have already begun with warnings to some and detentions for others. I checked with foreign journalists over the weekend, and they say they're aware of the crackdowns, but are not feeling any heat themselves. Yet.

April 28, 2014 5:25 PM ET

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Statements   |   China

CPJ condemns attack on media executives in Hong Kong

New York, March 19, 2014--The Committee to Protect Journalists condemns today's attack on two senior media executives in Hong Kong by four masked men armed with metal bars. The executives work for Hong Kong Media News, which is preparing to launch a Chinese-language newspaper, and have been identified in reports as Lei Iun-han, director and vice-president, and Lam Kin-ming, news controller. The two sought treatment for injuries to their face, arms, and legs, the reports said.

Blog   |   China

FCCC survey finds China abuses press card, visa process

The Foreign Correspondents' Club of China (Beijing) published the findings of its annual visa survey last week. The findings are grim but come as no surprise following the Chinese government's showdown late last year with members of the foreign press. 

Blog   |   China

Chinese journalist Liu Jianfeng crowdsources his funding

Last July, veteran Chinese journalist Liu Jianfeng posted an announcement on the Chinese microblog Weibo, confirming his intention to become an independent investigator and writer. In a country where all media remains state-owned, Liu's plan was a bold one. He promised to produce four to six independent, investigative stories in the coming year, and to fund his costs by crowdsourcing. His financial target was 250,000 yuan (about US$40,000).

March 5, 2014 3:36 PM ET

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Blog   |   China

Journalists in Hong Kong and China: see our security guide

Journalists from Ming Pao hold up front pages of the paper to protest an attack on their former chief editor, Kevin Lau Chun-to. (Reuters/Bobby Yip)

CPJ's Journalist Security Guide is now available in Chinese (PDF). The guide has been available in other languages for more than a year but, frankly, we didn't see a Chinese version as a priority. Last year, after a university professor in China asked if he could translate some sections for his class, we began working on a Chinese version in simplified characters. We felt it was our responsibility to take care of the task ourselves. 

Alerts   |   China

China slaps separatism charges on Uighur blogger

New York, February 26, 2014--Chinese authorities should immediately release a Uighur blogger and academic who has been charged with separatism after being held incommunicado and without charge since January 15, the Committee to Protect Journalists said today.

Alerts   |   China

Former Hong Kong editor in critical condition after attack

Protesters urge police to apprehend the perpetrators of an attack on Hong Kong journalist Kevin Lau Chun-to. (Reuters/Tyrone Siu)

Hong Kong, February 26, 2014--The Committee to Protect Journalists condemns today's attack on a journalist in Hong Kong and calls on authorities to conduct a thorough and efficient investigation and ensure the perpetrators are brought to justice. Kevin Lau Chun-to is now in critical condition, according to news reports.

Attacks on the Press   |   China

Journalists in Hong Kong and Taiwan Battle Beijing's Influence

Media owners' reluctance to draw China's disfavor imperils the ability of the Hong Kong and Taiwanese press to play a watchdog role. By a CPJ Contributor

Popular protests like this one in Taipei on January 1, 2013, helped derail a plan for a wealthy business tycoon with interests in China to buy Taiwan's largest newspaper. (AFP/Mandy Cheng)
Popular protests like this one in Taipei on January 1, 2013, helped derail a plan for a wealthy business tycoon with interests in China to buy Taiwan's largest newspaper. (AFP/Mandy Cheng)

Attacks on the Press   |   China

Attacks on the Press in 2013: China

Despite expectations for greater transparency after President Xi Jinping took office in March, Beijing continued to try to suppress information on a broad range of issues. A CPJ report in March found that the government struggled to cope with ever more pervasive digital platforms that Chinese citizens used to express themselves. In September, authorities once again tightened social media controls. Under the new rules, people who posted comments deemed libelous and that were reposted 500 or more times faced defamation charges and up to three years in prison. Subsequently, hundreds of social media users including some journalists were arrested although most were released by the end of 2013. China ranked third on CPJ's annual census of journalists imprisoned around the world, behind only Turkey and Iran. Shi Tao, a Chinese journalist who was given a 10-year prison sentence in 2005, the first high-profile conviction for online activity, was released from prison in August, 15 months before the end of his term. CPJ research has shown that most jailed journalists serve their full sentences. A survey by the Foreign Correspondents' Club of China said reporting conditions had worsened over the past year, as the Chinese government "increasingly resorted to threats and intimidation against foreign media."

February 12, 2014 1:36 AM ET

Blog   |   China

Tougher tactics emerge in China's media crackdown

Late in 2013, Time's Hannah Beech posted a great blog on the magazine's website around the time that about 24 foreign journalists were worried that the visas allowing them to work in China might not be approved: "Foreign Correspondents in China Do Not Censor Themselves to Get Visas," she told readers. She's right, of course, and some more proof that they won't dial back their coverage arose last week. 

« 2013