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Zambia

Blog   |   Zambia

Mission Journal: In Zambia, Sata never fulfilled promise of greater transparency

Taxi drivers read the news of President Michael Sata's death in The Post special edition on October 29, 2014 in Lusaka. (AFP/Chibala Zulu)

"We'll see for ourselves on Friday," was a refrain on the lips of most journalists I met in Lusaka in mid-September, as they speculated on the health of President Michael Sata ahead of their country's opening of parliament, where the leader was due to speak.

Blog   |   Zambia

Zambia silences critics with lawsuits, Web blocking

President Michael Sata's mounting attacks on the press have had a chilling effect on freedom of expression in Zambia. (AFP/Simon Maina)

The charges leveled against a Zambian journalist suspected by authorities of being linked to the blocked news website Zambian Watchdog make for interesting reading.

Blog   |   Burundi, Gambia, Somalia, Tanzania, Zambia, Zimbabwe

A bid to rid Africa of criminal defamation, sedition laws

The African Union's special rapporteur on freedom of expression and access to information, Commissioner Pansy Tlakula, has launched an auspicious initiative in East Africa to counter criminal defamation and sedition laws. Since independence, authorities and business interests in the East and Horn region have used criminal laws on sedition, libel, and insult--often relics of former, colonial administrations--to silence their critics in the press. "Criminal defamation laws are nearly always used to punish legitimate criticism of powerful people, rather than protect the right to a reputation," Tlakula said in a statement.

July 12, 2013 3:48 PM ET

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Blog   |   Zambia

Zambian editor acquitted in hospital 'obscenity' case

Chansa Kabwela speaks to reporters. (Thomas Nsama)

As the news editor of Zambia’s largest circulation newspaper and a mother to two young children, Chansa Kabwela already has her hands full. For the last four months, however, this 29-year-old journalist was mired in a court case with a peculiarity that made international headlines and sparked a debate on press freedom in this landlocked nation in southern Africa. The case was finally resolved on Monday.

November 17, 2009 5:10 PM ET

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Blog   |   Zambia

Press freedom slips in Zambia

(Collins Phiri/The Post)In Zambia, the coming week will mark the anniversary of the untimely death of President Levy Patrick Mwanawasa. The late president had championed press freedom with his commitments to reform, and, with his passing, the Zambian media lost an ally. Worse, the media freedoms gained in recent years are now slipping. 

August 14, 2009 4:41 PM ET

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Blog   |   Zambia

Media reform stagnates in Zambia

On September 27, the High Court in Zambia's capital, Lusaka, granted acting President Rupiah Banda an injunction restraining The Post newspaper from publishing libelous words against him. Zambia's Sunday Times reported that the court had also given a penal notice to Editor-in-Chief Fred M'membe to comply with the order. M'membe refused and appealed to the court to dismiss the charges against him, but the High Court threw out the application.

Despite promises made in early 2002 by the Ministry of Information and media stakeholders to review media laws that indirectly hinder press freedom, there has been no change in Zambian defamation legislation. Fred M'membe and The Post are in the news for the umpteenth time for the same offense. 

October 10, 2008 6:22 PM ET

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