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Blog   |   Philippines

Maguindanao five years on

November 23 will mark five years since the Maguindanao massacre, the single deadliest event for the press since the Committee to Protect Journalists began keeping records in 1992.

November 20, 2014 3:18 PM ET

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Accounting for impunity is obligation for all states

This week, members of UNESCO's International Programme for the Development of Communication will meet to discuss the director general's biannual report, which examines the cases of nearly 600 journalists killed around the world from January 1, 2006 to December 31, 2013. The report, and lacklustre response from member states who had been asked to provide status updates to the cases, highlights why the campaign to end impunity is so vital.

November 18, 2014 4:22 PM ET

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Blog   |   China

Amid US-China talks, tough words from Xi Jinping for foreign press

President Xi Jinping, pictured right, with Barack Obama at a Beijing press conference on November 12, where he was questioned about visa restrictions for the foreign press. (AFP/Mandel Ngan)

Chinese President Xi Jinping issued tough words on the visa woes of international media outlets today, arguing that journalists facing visa restrictions had brought trouble on themselves and signaling that there will be little respite for the international media in China.

Blog   |   Pakistan

More threats against Pakistan's Hamid Mir

Pakistani journalist Hamid Mir was hit by six bullets in April and, more recently, a new round of threats. (AP/Anjum Naveed)

The well-known and controversial Pakistani television talk show host Hamid Mir survived a murder attempt on April 19, even though he was hit with six bullets--two of which are still in his body. "I can move, I can walk and I can talk, but I am still undergoing physiotherapy and taking medication," he emailed to a small group of associates, including CPJ, over the weekend.

November 10, 2014 3:11 PM ET

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Blog   |   Japan

Japan's state secrets law, a minefield for journalists

Protesters gather in Tokyo in 2013 to voice concern over the Protection of Specially Designated Secrets Act, which is due to come into force in December. (Reuters/Toru Hanai)

On October 14, as Japan prepared to mark Newspaper Week--an event set up to promote the public right to know--Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's cabinet publicly announced guidelines on how the country's security law, which was passed in December 2013, is to be implemented. This date will be remembered as the point at which the public's access to government information was decimated. Under the Protection of Specially Designated Secrets Act (SDS), whistleblowing civil servants face up to 10 years in prison and the journalists who work with them could face up to five years for leaking state secrets. The guidelines will come into force on December 10, with no opportunity before that date for the public or lawmakers to change them.

Blog   |   China, Taiwan

Taiwan journalists feel pressure as elections approach

Activists rally outside parliament in support of students occupying the building to protest a trade pact with China in Taipei on March 21, 2014. (AFP/Mandy Cheng)

Political tensions are rising in Taiwan ahead of local and municipal elections due at the end of November. The vote is expected to test the popularity of the ruling Kuomintang Party (KMT), which advocates greater integration with China and which earlier this year sparked protests when it tried to pass a new economic cooperation deal with the mainland. The vote also comes as the Taiwanese are closely watching how Beijing responds to pro-democracy protests in Hong Kong.

Blog   |   China

Hong Kong's media battlefield

Student leaders speak to the press at a pro-democracy protest outside the central government offices in Hong Kong on Thursday. (AFP/Alex Ogle)

Hong Kong's pro-democracy protests are among the best covered in history. The city is saturated with print, broadcast, and social media, traveling across some of the best networks on earth. Its citizens are among the most connected in the world. And for all the media's flaws, consumers expect them to deliver.

Blog   |   Pakistan

When it comes to the right to report, journalists must stand together

Pakistani journalists I have met over the years know that while I might be an American, I have never been an apologist for the U.S. government. The goal of the Committee to Protect Journalists is to assist members of the press no matter where they are, and if we have to criticize their governments, well that's part of the job. We don't accept money from any government, and we don't promote any government's policies. We stay focused on journalists, their safety, and their rights. My beat is Asia, and the threats and intimidation faced by journalists working in that region is where our Asia team puts its focus.

October 14, 2014 12:52 PM ET

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Blog   |   China, Security

Journalist in Hong Kong? These tips will keep you safer and help you do your best job

Police officers face off with protesters blocking the entrance to Hong Kong's Chief Executive Leung Chun-ying offices on Thursday. (Reuters/Carlos Barria)

We have been receiving reports of harassment and the use of force directed toward journalists covering the demonstrations in Hong Kong. Most of the incidents came over the weekend with the government's ill-advised attempt to end the protests with police force. But with tensions building today, more clashes with police seem possible.

October 2, 2014 1:14 PM ET

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Blog   |   China

Amid Hong Kong protests, journalists battle misperceptions of press freedom

Pro-democracy protesters hold umbrellas under heavy rain in a street near the government headquarters in Hong Kong late on Tuesday, September 30. (AP)

EDITOR'S NOTE: As pro-democracy protests in Hong Kong intensify ahead of China's National Day on Wednesday, some reporters have been caught in the melee. But for Hong Kong's journalists, there is more at stake than run-ins with the riot police.

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