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2011

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News from the Committee to Protect Journalists, December 2011

Tajik journalist Makhmadyusuf Ismoilov was convicted on insult charges in October, but was released from prison. He is banned from all journalistic work for three years. (RFE/RL Radio Ozodi)

The year in press freedom

This year was marked by a wave of anti-press violence as social unrest stirred millions into action. Journalists from Belarus to Egypt and Mexico to Beijing continued exposing the truth despite being attacked for their reporting.

The Committee to Protect Journalists' thorough documentation and high-level advocacy helped to ensure that you heard the stories of the journalists silenced by violence, muted by torture, cowed into self-censorship, or suppressed by exile. On the front lines and online--we persevered in the fight to preserve freedom of the press and our collective right to be informed. 

December 29, 2011 10:09 AM ET

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News from the Committee to Protect Journalists, November 2011

Honoring those who buck the system

CPJ and about 900 supporters recently embarked on an emotional journey with four journalists from Bahrain, Belarus, Mexico, and Pakistan. At the 2011 International Press Freedom Awards in New York's Waldorf Astoria on November 22, we celebrated their daring reporting and relentless efforts to expose the truth in defiance of violence, torture, self-censorship, and exile.

December 5, 2011 11:17 AM ET

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News from the Committee to Protect Journalists, October 2011

IPFA awardees, from left, al-Jamri, Radina, Cheema, and Valdez.

CPJ announces 2011 press freedom awards

Four courageous journalists from Bahrain, Belarus, Mexico, and Pakistan will be honored with CPJ's 2011 International Press Freedom Awards at an annual awards dinner in New York on November 22.  Following his release after four years in prison, Azerbaijani editor Eynulla Fatullayev will at last join CPJ as a special guest to receive his 2009 award. CPJ and others helped win Fatullayev's freedom in May. CPJ will also honor veteran U.S. journalist Dan Rather with the Burton Benjamin Memorial Award. Click here for more information about attending the dinner.
October 28, 2011 6:02 PM ET

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News from the Committee to Protect Journalists, September 2011

Addis Neger's newsroom in 2009, before the editors fled and the paper folded. (Addis Neger)

Journalist ID'd in WikiLeaks cable, flees Ethiopia

U.S. diplomatic cables disclosed last month by WikiLeaks cited Ethiopian journalist Argaw Ashine by name and referred to his unnamed government source, forcing Ashine to flee the country after police interrogated him over the source's identity. It is the first instance CPJ has confirmed in which a citation in one of the cables has caused direct repercussions for a journalist.

After learning about Ashine's forced exile, CPJ's Africa and Journalist Assistance programs collaborated to assist him. Once at a safe location, Ashine worked with CPJ to tell the world about his abrupt exile. The story generated international attention, along with a critical reply from WikiLeaks. CPJ has defended WikiLeaks in the past when it faced potential prosecution under espionage laws, but we have overriding interest in protecting the safety of journalists. CPJ is now reviewing the more than 200,000 cables recently disclosed by WikiLeaks--most of which were unredacted--to determine whether any other journalists are cited.

September 29, 2011 5:31 PM ET

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News from the Committee to Protect Journalists, August 2011

Detention of a new suspect in the Politkovskaya murder

AP

In a significant development in the investigation into the murder of Novaya Gazeta journalist Anna Politkovskaya, the Investigative Committee of the Russian Federation--the agency tasked with solving Politkovskaya's murder--announced on August 16 that it had detained retired Lt. Col. Dmitry Pavlyuchenkov on suspicion of having organized the crime. Pavlyuchenkov had worked as the head of surveillance at Moscow's Main Internal Affairs Directorate, the city's main police force, when Politkovskaya was shot dead in her apartment building in 2006. Investigators allege Pavlyuchenkov received payment for planning the journalist's murder and recruiting assailants to carry it out. The alleged gunman was arrested in late May

CPJ Europe and Central Asia Program Coordinator Nina Ognianova spent the past three months in Russia researching impunity cases. In September 2010, a CPJ delegation met with the Investigative Committee, which resulted in a pledge by the committee to re-investigate several of the 19 unsolved murders of journalists in Russia, including the case of Politkovskaya. 

August 31, 2011 4:49 PM ET

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News from the Committee to Protect Journalists, July 2011

In Cuba, the Ladies in White were instrumental in drawing attention to the plight of imprisoned journalists and dissidents. Here, they hold a photo of Orlando Zapata Tamayo, who died in custody. (AP/Javier Galeano)

Still struggling for a free Cuban press

As Cuba implements economic reforms and prepares to introduce high-speed Internet, freedom of expression continues to be met with a policy of repression that stifles the free flow of information, according to a new report by CPJ.

The report examines government activities in March and April 2011, a time when sensitive political milestones on the island coincided with 50 instances of independent journalists' repression. In the report, CPJ makes recommendations to the Cuban government, the European Union, the United Nations, the Organization of American States, the U.S. government, and the technology and blogging communities.

July 28, 2011 6:34 PM ET

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News from the Committee to Protect Journalists, June 2011

CPJ Chairman Sandra Mims Rowe

CPJ welcomes new leadership

Sandra Mims Rowe, a distinguished editor with a record of journalistic and civic leadership, has been elected chairman of CPJ. Rowe succeeds Paul Steiger, president and editor-in-chief of ProPublica. Steiger served as CPJ chairman since 2005.

"We are immensely grateful to Paul Steiger for his untiring leadership, and we are excited for the future of CPJ under Sandra Mims Rowe's direction," said CPJ Executive Director Joel Simon. 

June 29, 2011 4:32 PM ET

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News from the Committee to Protect Journalists, May 2011

CPJ delegation meets with President Asif Ali Zardari (APP)
Pakistan pledges justice

Pakistan's president committed to pursue justice for journalists killed in the line of duty, pledging to take steps to reverse the country's rising record of impunity. A delegation from the Committee to Protect Journalists, headed by outgoing Chairman Paul Steiger, met with President Asif Ali Zardari on World Press Freedom Day. The CPJ group urged him to ensure that journalists are free to report on sensitive issues. The president's commitment will be monitored by CPJ and national press freedom groups.

May 26, 2011 2:27 PM ET

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News from the Committee to Protect Journalists, April 2011

Digital frontiers and beyond

To mark World Press Freedom Day 2011, CPJ will publish "The 10 Tools of Online Oppressors," a special report on the most threatening tactics to suppress online journalists and bloggers as well as the countries making exemplary use of these censorship tools. The report will be published on www.cpj.org on May 2.

CPJ Internet Advocacy Coordinator Danny O'Brien, who authored the report, will join "Censorship Without Borders," a panel discussion about new technologies and the spread of online censorship tools to be held in Washington as part of a global conference commemorating World Press Freedom Day.
April 29, 2011 7:40 PM ET

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News from the Committee to Protect Journalists, March 2011

An airstrike targets a tank belonging to Qaddafi forces near Benghazi. (Reuters/Goran Tomasevic)

Deadly and dangerous in the Middle East

With more than 300 attacks on the media, ranging from detentions, obstruction of coverage, and threats to disappearances and killings, the wave of unrest sweeping across the Middle East has turned into an increasingly challenging story for local and foreign journalists. As Executive Director Joel Simon recently told the Financial Times, "These governments that are struggling to survive see control of information as an essential part of maintaining their regime."

The unrest has brought with it the killing of five journalists across the region. Detentions have sometimes been accompanied by torture, as in the case of BBC reporters and the New York Times journalists taken into custody by government forces in Libya, where there have been more than 60 attacks on media. You can see a running tally of Libyan press violations on the CPJ Blog. At least 10 journalists remain missing or detained in the country.

March 23, 2011 5:04 PM ET

2011

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