Jordan

2013

Blog   |   Egypt, Iraq, Israel and the Occupied Palestinian Territory, Jordan, Syria

Arab journalists need training for civil unrest and wars

Journalists ride in an army soldiers' carrier to the front line during clashes between forces loyal to Syrian President Bashar al-Assad and opposition fighters on August 24, 2013. (Reuters/Khaled al-Hariri)

In recent years, Arab journalists have been taking great risks to report important stories in a region where war and civil unrest remain an ever-present threat. Many are operating without proper equipment or safety training in how to recognize and mitigate the various risks they face.

Alerts   |   Jordan, Philippines

Al-Arabiya reporter released from captivity in Philippines

New York, December 4, 2013--The Committee to Protect Journalists welcomes the release today of a reporter working for Al-Arabiya news channel who, along with two crewmembers, was abducted by Islamist militants 18 months ago.

Letters   |   Jordan

CPJ urges review of press law and unblocking of websites

Dear Prime Minister Ensour: We are writing to express our concern about the implications of Jordan's Press and Publications Law, which was amended last year and used most recently to block more than 300 websites.

Alerts   |   Jordan

Authorities block hundreds of websites in Jordan

New York, June 3, 2013--The Jordanian government announced plans on Sunday to block more than 300 websites for failing to register under the Press and Publications Law, news sources reported. Access to several of the sites has already been blocked within the country, the reports said.

Attacks on the Press   |   Jordan

Attacks on the Press in 2012: Jordan

Although Jordanian news media enjoy greater freedom than the press in many other Arab countries, the kingdom took a significant step backward with the approval of amendments to the Press and Publications Law in September 2012. The law imposed new restrictions on online news content, required sites to obtain official licenses, and gave the authorities powers to block domestic and international websites. Journalists, outraged by the move, protested against the government, and website owners refused to apply for licenses. Criticism of the royal family or the monarchy remained off-limits for all media. One journalist was detained for three weeks for writing an article that alleged misconduct in the Royal Court, and a critical blogger was stabbed by an unidentified assailant after she published an article criticizing Prince Hassan bin Talal.

February 14, 2013 12:05 AM ET
« 2012 | 2014 »