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Alerts   |   Oman

Oman holding blogger Muawiyah Alrawahi at psychiatric hospital

Muawiyah Alrawahi (Twitter)

New York, August 5, 2014--CPJ is concerned for the welfare of critical Omani blogger Muawiyah Alrawahi, who disappeared last month after being summoned by intelligence officials, according to human rights groups. A photo appeared on Twitter in recent days showing Alrawahi at the psychiatric department of Sultan Qaboos University Hospital, with his legs shackled, according to the London-based Monitor of Human Rights in Oman.

Alrawahi is known for using his blog and YouTube channel to discuss atheism and raise other sensitive topics, including criticism of Sultan Qaboos.

August 5, 2014 4:51 PM ET

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Letters   |   Oman

CPJ concerned by politicized trial in Oman

Your Majesty Sultan Qaboos bin Sa'id: The Committee to Protect Journalists is writing to bring to your attention reports of an unfair trial of two Omani journalists and a civil servant sentenced to imprisonment on defamation charges. We ask you, in your capacity as head of the Supreme Judicial Council, to instruct the judicial authorities to respect the letter of the law and allow the defendants an opportunity to prove their innocence. This case will be appealed on October 15, and we hope the verdict against the newspaper and the three men will be reversed. We are also alarmed by the October 9 royal decree that amends an article in the Press and Publications Law, further tightening government control over the media, and urge you to consider the negative effect the amendment will have on independent media in Oman.

Alerts   |   Oman

Omani judiciary attempts to silence newspaper before trial

New York, August 25, 2011--Charges against prominent Omani journalist and filmmaker Youssef al-Haj should be dropped immediately, the Committee to Protect Journalists said today.  Al-Haj's trial over an article he wrote that allegedly accused the Ministry of Justice of corruption began on August 14 but was postponed until this Sunday. At the August 14 hearing, the judge ordered that the newspaper that published al-Haj's story, Al-Zaman, not print any details of the case, local human rights activists told CPJ. 

August 25, 2011 5:42 PM ET

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Alerts   |   Oman

Omani newspaper under threat of being shut down

New York, August 12, 2011--The Sultanate of Oman is threatening to shut down the independent newspaper Al-Zaman for publishing an article alleging corruption in the Ministry of Justice, the Committee to Protect Journalists said today. The article's author, prominent Omani journalist and filmmaker Youssef al-Haj, stands trial on Sunday and could face prison time if convicted.
August 12, 2011 4:49 PM ET

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Alerts   |   Bahrain, Morocco, Oman, Saudi Arabia, Syria, Yemen

Morocco, Syria detain journalists; violations across region

New York, May 4, 2011--The Committee to Protect Journalists called on Morocco today to release editor Rachid Nini and sought the release of journalist Dorothy Parvaz as well as other journalists in Syria. Press freedom violations continued throughout the region, with abuses in Bahrain, Saudi Arabia, Oman, and Yemen.

Blog   |   Dubai, Internet, Oman, UAE

More on RIM

Another piece on RIM by the Guardian, this time reporting that the UAE were after BlackBerry messaging info, because of its use in spreading gossip about high-profile Emiratis. These quotes (translated here) from Dubai's police chief, Lt.-Gen. Dahi Khalfan Tamim, where he says the ban was also "meant to control false rumors and defamation of public figures due to absence of surveillance", tend to confirm that.

Meanwhile, not to be outdone, Oman has banned Virtual Private Networks (commonly used to give correspondents access to the company network back home). Not surprising, given that Oman supposedly already bans the use of encryption. Will it go after the banks next?

September 3, 2010 8:42 PM ET

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Attacks on the Press   |   Algeria, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Morocco, Oman, Saudi Arabia, Syria, Tunisia, Yemen

Attacks on the Press 2007: Middle East Analysis

Under the Radar, a New Kind of Repression
By Joel Campagna 

On a Wednesday afternoon last June, Yemeni security agents stormed the home of outspoken editor Abdel Karim al-Khaiwani and dragged him before a State Security Court in the capital, Sana'a. A prosecutor questioned al-Khaiwani and later rang him up on charges of belonging to a secret terrorist cell--charges that carry a possible death sentence. The arrest shocked Yemeni journalists, and some wondered aloud whether their colleague, known for his incendiary columns attacking the Yemeni government and its battle with rebels in the northwestern city of Saada, might have been involved in something nefarious. CPJ issued guarded statements of concern, unsure whether the charge had substance. 

February 5, 2008 12:06 PM ET

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Attacks on the Press   |   Algeria, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Libya, Morocco, Oman, Saudi Arabia, Syria, Tunisia, UAE, Yemen

Attacks on the Press 2006: Middle East Analysis

As democracy falters, Arab press still pushes for freedom
By Joel Campagna

Across the Middle East, political reform gained momentum in the aftermath of the September 11, 2001, attacks on the United States and the U.S.-led invasion of Iraq in March 2003. Egyptians and Lebanese clamored for democracy; elections in Iraq, Palestine, Yemen, and Saudi Arabia offered a more pluralistic future. In a number of Arab countries, the media seized the moment. Newspapers in Egypt and Yemen smashed long-held taboos by openly criticizing political leaders, while in Iraq the toppling of Saddam Hussein opened the way for a vibrant news media. Autocrats known for smothering dissent suddenly touted the virtues of democracy, a system of government that U.S. President George W. Bush, buoyed by initial military success in Iraq, vowed to spread across a region of princes and potentates.
February 5, 2007 11:53 AM ET

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Attacks on the Press   |   Algeria, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Libya, Morocco, Oman, Saudi Arabia, Syria, Tunisia, Yemen

Attacks on the Press 2006: Analysis: As Democracy Falters, Arab Press Still Pushes for Freedom

Across the Middle East, political reform gained momentum in the aftermath of the September 11, 2001, attacks on the United States and the U.S.-led invasion of Iraq in March 2003. Egyptians
and Lebanese clamored for democracy; elections in Iraq, Palestine, Yemen, and Saudi Arabia offered a more pluralistic future. In a number of Arab countries, the media seized the moment. Newspapers in Egypt and Yemen smashed long-held taboos by openly criticizing political leaders, while in Iraq the toppling of Saddam Hussein opened the way for a vibrant news media. Autocrats known for smothering dissent suddenly touted the virtues of democracy, a system of government that U.S. President George W. Bush, buoyed by initial military success in Iraq, vowed to spread across a region of princes and potentates.
February 5, 2007 11:53 AM ET

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  |   Algeria, Bahrain, Egypt, Georgia, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Oman, Saudi Arabia, Sudan, Tunisia, UAE

Arabic Satellite Channels and Censorship


Arabic Satellite Channels and Censorship

By Joel Campagna
Committee to Protect Journalists
May 25, 2005 8:04 PM ET

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