Special Reports

USA

Reports   |   USA

The Obama Administration and the Press

Leak investigations and surveillance in post-9/11 America

U.S. President Barack Obama came into office pledging open government, but he has fallen short of his promise. Journalists and transparency advocates say the White House curbs routine disclosure of information and deploys its own media to evade scrutiny by the press. Aggressive prosecution of leakers of classified information and broad electronic surveillance programs deter government sources from speaking to journalists. A CPJ special report by Leonard Downie Jr. with reporting by Sara Rafsky

Barack Obama leaves a press conference in the East Room of the White House August 9. (AFP/Saul Loeb)

Reports   |   USA

CPJ's recommendations to the Obama administration

CPJ is disturbed by the pattern of actions by the Obama administration that have chilled the flow of information on issues of great public interest, including matters of national security. The administration's war on leaks to the press through the use of secret subpoenas against news organizations, its assertion through prosecution that leaking classified documents to the press is espionage or aiding the enemy, and its increased limitations on access to information that is in the public interest -- all thwart a free and open discussion necessary to a democracy.

Reports   |   Multimedia, USA

Video: Bailey project combats impunity

In "Banding Together: The Chauncey Bailey Project Fights Impunity," CPJ’s Maria Salazar-Ferro describes how a group of Bay Area journalists worked together to ensure that the murder of their colleague did not go unpunished. Using investigative journalism as an advocacy tool, the Bailey Project held authorities accountable and brought about the conviction of the mastermind. (3:05)

Please read the CPJ special report on journalists killed and visit our database of reporters, editors, photojournalists, and others who have given their lives for their work.

December 20, 2011 12:00 AM ET

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Reports   |   Azerbaijan, Burma, Cambodia, Cameroon, China, Cuba, Egypt, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gambia, India, Iran, Iraq, Kazakhstan, Morocco, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Sri Lanka, Syria, Tunisia, Turkey, USA, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Vietnam, Yemen

CPJ's 2009 prison census: Freelance journalists under fire

Demonstrators demand the release of documentary filmmaker Dhondup Wangchen, jailed in China after interviewing Tibetans. (AFP)

New York, December 8, 2009—Freelancers now make up nearly 45 percent of all journalists jailed worldwide, a dramatic recent increase that reflects the evolution of the global news business, the Committee to Protect Journalists said today. In its annual census of imprisoned journalists, CPJ found a total of 136 reporters, editors, and photojournalists behind bars on December 1, an increase of 11 from the 2008 tally. (Read detailed accounts of each imprisoned journalist.) A massive crackdown in Iran, where 23 journalists are now in jail, fueled the worldwide increase.

Reports   |   Burma, China, Cuba, Eritrea, Gambia, Iran, Iraq, Israel and the Occupied Palestinian Territory, USA, Uzbekistan

CPJ's 2008 prison census: Online and in jail

Also: See capsule reports on journalists in jail as of December 1, 2008

New York, December 4, 2008--Reflecting the rising influence of online reporting and commentary, more Internet journalists are jailed worldwide today than journalists working in any other medium. In its annual census of imprisoned journalists, released today, the Committee to Protect Journalists found that 45 percent of all media workers jailed worldwide are bloggers, Web-based reporters, or online editors. Online journalists represent the largest professional category for the first time in CPJ's prison census.

Dangerous Assignments   |   Iraq, USA

A California Dream for Jehad Ali

After Jehad Ali's leg was shattered by assailants in Iraq, colleagues raised money, and surgeons in California offered help. Now, Ali has cleared another big hurdle: He's gained permission to enter the United States. By Robert Mahoney


October 7, 2008 1:42 PM ET

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Dangerous Assignments   |   USA

The Local Newsman - A CPJ Special Report

Chauncey Bailey was a tough local reporter who dug into crime and corruption. The murder of a journalist may seem to be an aberration in the United States, but Bailey's case shows that there is much more to the story.
October 31, 2007 12:00 PM ET

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October 3, 2006 12:00 AM ET

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Dangerous Assignments   |   Bosnia, USA

CPJ Dangerous Assignments: Profile in Courage

Zeljko Kopanja lost his legs for daring to suggest that some of his fellow Bosnian Serbs were guilty of war crimes.
December 15, 1999 8:17 PM ET

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