Fahem Boukadous

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Attacks on the Press   |   Algeria, Bahrain, Egypt, Jordan, Kuwait, Libya, Mauritania, Morocco, Syria, Tunisia

Attacks on the Press: From Uprisings, Trends to Watch

Photographers take cover during November protests in Tahrir Square. (AFP/Mahmud Hams)

The Middle East's political shifts changed conditions for journalists dramatically. The emerging trends favor free expression, but are filled with ambiguity and depend on the political configurations to emerge after the revolutionary dust has settled. By Mohamed Abdel Dayem

Attacks on the Press   |   Tunisia

Attacks on the Press in 2011: Tunisia

The press enjoyed new freedom after Zine El Abidine Ben Ali was ousted in January amid widespread protests, although a photographer was killed covering the unrest. The release of veteran journalist Fahem Boukadous after several months in prison was welcome news for a press corps accustomed to continued harassment and detention during Ben Ali's 23-year reign. News media were able to report freely during parliamentary elections in October; no major press freedom violations were reported during the voting. But throughout the year, journalists were still vulnerable to assault. In May, plainclothes police attacked several local and international journalists who were covering anti-government demonstrations. Licenses were issued to more than 100 new publications during the year, but some vestiges of censorship lingered. Hannibal TV, a station owned by a Ben Ali relative, was forced off the air for more than three hours in January.

February 21, 2012 12:11 AM ET

Blog   |   Tunisia

Tunisian media: One year after the revolution

The doses of freedom that the Tunisian revolution injected into national media have not been sufficient to revive it after decades of systematic destruction. It is not surprising that our evaluation of media one year after the tyrant fell reveals more negativity and pessimism.

January 23, 2012 1:42 PM ET

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Attacks on the Press   |   Tunisia

Attacks on the Press 2010: Tunisia

Top Developments
• Targeting journalists, government criminalizes contact with foreign organizations.
• Private broadcast licenses are controlled by Ben Ali's family and friends.

Key Statistic
5: Years of imprisonment for violations of new law barring contact with foreign groups.


Tunisia remained one of the region's most repressive nations even as it sought to project an image of liberalism and modernity. The government of President Zine el Abidine Ben Ali jailed at least three journalists during the year, one of whom remained in custody when CPJ conducted its annual census of imprisoned journalists on December 1. Vague new legislation targeted critical journalists and human rights defenders by criminalizing international communications that the government deemed harmful to its interests.

February 15, 2011 12:11 AM ET

Impact

CPJ Impact

News from the Committee to Protect Journalists, January 2011

A December suicide attack in Pakistan's Mohmand tribal district claimed the lives of two journalists. (Reuters/Umar Qayyum)

2011 begins with a bang

Barely a month into the new year, multiple crises have kept CPJ on emergency call. Crackdowns in Ivory Coast and Belarus, along with oppressive legislation in Hungary, Saudi Arabia and Vietnam, leave no doubt that those seeking to silence independent media are well energized.

January 26, 2011 4:39 PM ET

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Blog   |   Tunisia

Freed! Fahem Boukadous released in Tunisia

For those who have spent countless hours exposing and combating Tunisia's vast press freedom abuses, today is truly a glorious day. Tunisian authorities released the ailing imprisoned journalist Fahem Boukadous, a day after CPJ called on the transitional government to honor its pledge to free all political prisoners. Today, we can loudly proclaim that no journalist or blogger is imprisoned in the government's dungeons and that Zine El Abidine Ben Ali's censorship is no longer imposed on Tunisians. 

January 19, 2011 9:16 PM ET

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Alerts   |   Tunisia

In Tunisia, one journalist still jailed, another killed

Dolega, center standing, is seen on assignment in 2008. He died from head injuries suffered while covering street protests in Tunis. (Reuters/Charles Platiau)

New York, January 18, 2011--Tunisia's transitional government should immediately release Fahem Boukadous, a television reporter imprisoned last year in reprisal for his work, the Committee to Protect Journalists said today. CPJ also offered condolences to the family and colleagues of French photographer Lucas Mebrouk Dolega, who died of head injuries suffered while covering the civil unrest in the capital, Tunis.

January 18, 2011 4:24 PM ET

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Alerts   |   Tunisia

As Ben Ali's regime falls, 3 Tunisian journalists freed

New York, January 14, 2011--The Committee to Protect Journalists is heartened by news reports that three jailed Tunisian journalists have been freed as the repressive regime of Zine El Abidine Ben Ali has fallen. CPJ calls on the new interim Tunisian government to release one other journalist believed to be still in custody. 

January 14, 2011 8:51 PM ET

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