Soe Thein

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Alerts   |   Burma

Burma takes another step toward repressing its media

New York, July 10, 2014--Donor countries should bring diplomatic pressure on Burma's government and reconsider their economic support for the country following Thursday's sentencing of four journalists of a magazine and the publication's chief executive to 10 years of hard labor in prison, the Committee to Protect Journalists said today.

Reports   |   Burma

Burma falters, backtracks on press freedom

The media landscape in Burma is more open than ever, as President Thein Sein releases imprisoned journalists and abolishes the former censorship regime. But many threats and obstacles to truly unfettered reporting remain, including restrictive laws held over from the previous military regime. The wider government’s commitment to a more open reporting environment is in doubt. A CPJ special report by Shawn W. Crispin

Villagers protest a copper mine project in the Latpadaung region in March 2013. (Reuters/Soe Zeya Tun)

Blog   |   Burma

Wary about Burma? So are others

Amid the rush to see changes in Burma as an inexorable move toward full democracy--Aung San Suu Kyi's electoral victory over the weekend is certainly cause for hope--CPJ has maintained a healthy skepticism about media reform in Burma. Shawn Crispin's "In Burma, press freedom remains an illusion," posted on Friday, is the most recent example of our thinking on the subject.  

April 2, 2012 1:57 PM ET

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Blog   |   Burma

In Burma, press freedom remains an illusion

Supporters of Burma opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi's party travel to a rally at a Yangon constituency on Friday. (AFP/Soe Than Win)

Just ahead of this weekend's highly anticipated Burma by-elections, opposition icon Aung San Suu Kyi today denounced the vote as not "free and fair." Indeed, Thein Sein government's harassment of opposition media in the run-up to the polls raises disturbing questions about the country's reputed new democratic direction after decades of repressive military rule. 

March 30, 2012 11:16 AM ET

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Blog   |   Burma

Freedom with limits in Burma

Win Maw, a journalist for Democratic Voice of Burma, is greeted by his wife as he arrives at Yangon airport after being released from prison Friday, Jan. 13. (AP/Khin Maung Win)

When President Thein Sein pardoned over 300 political prisoners last week in Burma, CPJ reported that at least nine journalists were among those released. Since then, the exile-run Democratic Voice of Burma (DVB) has announced that all of its jailed reporters, including a group of eight who had remained anonymous, are now free.

Alerts   |   Burma

In mass amnesty, nine journalists released in Burma

Burmese online journalist Nay Phone Latt is one of nine journalists released in a mass amnesty today. The journalist, 28, had been sentenced to 20 and a half years in prison. (AFP/Soe Than Win)

Bangkok, January 13, 2012--The Committee to Protect Journalists welcomes the release of nine journalists who were freed as part of a mass release of at least 600 political prisoners in Burma on Friday, but calls on President Thein Sein to release reporters still being held in detention and to implement press reforms that would end the country's repressive media environment.

Reports   |   Burma

In Burma, transition neglects press freedom

Thein Sein’s new civilian government has promised reform, but authorities continue to censor and imprison journalists. Those who report for critical, exile-run media remain at great risk. A CPJ special report by Shawn W. Crispin

Burma is at a crossroads between a tradition of military control and prospects for a democratic future. (AP/Khin Maung Win)

Reports   |   Burma

EU tiptoes toward engagement with Burma

A conflicted European Union considers a new approach toward Burma. Press freedom advocates and human rights defenders are wary. By Jean-Paul Marthoz

Opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi speaks with reporters after a September meeting with the European Commissioner for International Cooperation. (AFP/Soe Than Win)

September 20, 2011 12:02 AM ET

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Blog   |   Burma

Press freedom requires action, not talk, in Burma

Burmese taxi drivers read a newspaper featuring a picture of newly sworn-in president Thein Sein. (AFP/Soe Than Win)

Burma's newly installed democratic government has sent tentative signals that it intends to allow for more media openness as the country transitions from military to civilian rule. The continued detention of more than 2,100 political prisoners, including as many as 25 journalists, however, belies President Thein Sein's recent press-promoting pronouncements.

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