The New York Times

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Statements   |   Afghanistan

Times correspondent ordered out of Afghanistan

New York, August 20, 2014--The Committee to Protect Journalists condemns the Afghan government's decision to expel and ban New York Times correspondent Matthew Rosenberg from the country. The country's attorney general accused Rosenberg today of publishing a story "considered divisive and contrary to the national interest, security and stability of Afghanistan," according to the New York Times. Rosenberg was ordered to leave the country within 24 hours. The move would mark the first public expulsion of a Western journalist since the fall of the Taliban in 2001, the report said.

August 20, 2014 12:02 PM ET

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Statements   |   Afghanistan

New York Times reporter barred from leaving Afghanistan

New York, August 19, 2014--The Committee to Protect Journalists is alarmed by reports today that Afghan authorities have banned New York Times correspondent Matthew Rosenberg from leaving the country, according to news reports. Rosenberg is based in Kabul and Washington. His most recent story, published on Monday, alleged that some Afghan officials were threatening to seize power in the country if the impasse in recent presidential elections was not resolved. Rosenberg told CPJ via Twitter today that the attorney general's spokesman informed him of the travel ban after first communicating the news to the local news channel Tolo.

August 19, 2014 12:02 PM ET

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Alerts   |   China

Chinese journalist dismissed after writing on Hong Kong news website

New York, July 22, 2014--The Committee to Protect Journalists is concerned by the recent termination of a Chinese journalist from a monthly magazine after he wrote for a Hong Kong website. Song Zhibiao's dismissal marks the first publicized case of its kind following recent directives by the Chinese government that bar journalists from cooperating with foreign news agencies, according to The New York Times.

Statements   |   USA

CPJ commends U.S. Supreme Court decision requiring warrant for cellphone searches

San Francisco, June 25, 2014--The Committee to Protect Journalists welcomes today's unanimous ruling by the U.S. Supreme Court that held that law enforcement officials need search warrants to search the mobile phones of individuals they arrest. The court found that the data found in cellphones should be protected from routine inspection, news reports said.

June 25, 2014 1:50 PM ET

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Blog   |   USA

Obama transparency record remains unimpressive

President Obama speaks during the White House Correspondents' Association dinner in Washington on May 3. (AP/Jacquelyn Martin)

Nearly seven months ago, CPJ published its first in-depth report on press freedom in the United States, concluding that the Obama administration's aggressive prosecution of leakers of classified information, broad surveillance programs, and moves to stem the routine disclosure of information to the press meant that the president had fallen far short of his campaign promise to have the most open government in U.S. history. What's changed since? A quick survey of recent events suggests not much. 

Blog   |   Pakistan

Blacklisted in Baluchistan

Willem Marx, right, launched his book 'Balochistan at a Crossroads' on March 13 in New York City. (CPJ/Sumit Galhotra)

Pakistani Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif made a series of commitments to safeguard press freedom during a meeting with a CPJ delegation last week. Among them was a pledge to speak out in support of media freedom and against attacks on journalists, particularly in high-conflict areas like Baluchistan. 

Blog   |   China

FCCC survey finds China abuses press card, visa process

The Foreign Correspondents' Club of China (Beijing) published the findings of its annual visa survey last week. The findings are grim but come as no surprise following the Chinese government's showdown late last year with members of the foreign press. 

Blog   |   Internet, UK, USA

Media surveillance and 'the day we fight back'

Today, a broad coalition of technology companies, human rights organizations, political groups, and others will take to the Web and to the streets to protest mass surveillance. The mobilization, known as "The Day We Fight Back," honors activist and technologist Aaron Swartz, who passed away just over a year ago. Throughout the day, the campaign will encourage individuals to contact their representatives, pressure their employers, and march for an end to government surveillance practices that sweep up huge amounts of data, often indiscriminately.

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