Arab Spring

9 results arranged by date

They call themselves citizen journalists, media workers, or media activists. Amid the chaos of conflict, they are determined to gather and distribute the news. By María Salazar-Ferro

Journalists Bryn Karcha, center, of Canada, and Toshifumi Fujimoto, right, of Japan, run for cover with an unidentified fixer in Aleppo's district of Salaheddine on December 29, 2012. (Reuters/Muzaffar Salman)
Journalists Bryn Karcha, center, of Canada, and Toshifumi Fujimoto, right, of Japan, run for cover with an unidentified fixer in Aleppo's district of Salaheddine on December 29, 2012. (Reuters/Muzaffar Salman)

Egyptians gather in Cairo to mark the third anniversary of the uprising. (AFP/Mohamed el-Shahed)

New York, January 28, 2014--Several local and international journalists have been attacked and detained in Egypt while covering deadly clashes between police and supporters of ousted President Mohamed Morsi, according to news reports. The clashes erupted on Saturday, the third anniversary of the uprising in Egypt.

Ethiopian journalists Eskinder Nega and Reeyot Alemu. (Lennart Kjörling and IWMF)

In 1968, Andrei Sakharov braved censorship and personal risk in the Soviet Union to give humanity an honest and timeless declaration of conscience. That same year, Ethiopia's most prominent dissenter, Eskinder Nega, was born. In January 1981, a year into Sakharov's exile in the closed city of Gorky, Reeyot Alemu, another fierce, Ethiopian free thinker, was born.

In a country filled with paranoia and fear, citizens learn to be reporters. By Oliver Holmes

(AP/Ugarit News)

The right to news and opinion is enshrined in international law. It's not enough. By Joel Simon

(AFP/Spencer Platt)

An increase in press freedom violations last year created a surge of need among journalists, driving a record number of assistance cases for CPJ's Journalist Assistance Program in 2012. More than three-quarters of the 195 journalists who received support during the year came from East Africa and the Middle East and North Africa, reflecting the challenges--including threats of violence and imprisonment--of working in these repressive regions. Here are some of the highlights of our work over the last year:

Syria holds the highest record of killed journalists in any country swept by the Arab Spring.  In the one year, after the Syrian uprisings, CPJ has found eight local and international journalists killed. The Associated Press reports on CPJ's findings and outrage.  

Tim Hancock, of Amnesty International UK, rises to lend perspective on the on-going Leveson inquiry reminding the world that a free press is vital for far more than coverage of celebrity gossip. Citing CPJ figures he notes that in 2011 one third of all journalists killed occurred during coverage of the  Arab Spring, and that over the past decades journalism has become increasingly dangerous. While the inquiry casts a shadow on some publications and individuals, journalism is redeemed by those exceptional individuals who face constant and increasing danger to bring back the news.

In a rapidly changing Middle East, Turkey is increasingly being looked to by Arab neighbors as an example of what a post Arab-Spring society could look like. However, despite progressive, democratic, and secular institutions, the Turkish government maintains a dim view on press freedom. CPJ Executive Director Joel Simon goes on the record to denounce Turkey as one of the worst jailers of journalists in 2011 on NPR's Morning Edition.

9 results