Expelled

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Blog   |   Indonesia

Media restrictions in Papua underscore Indonesia's wider problems

A rally in Jakarta for the Free Papua Movement. Restricted media access to the Indonesian region has left the ongoing fight for secession under reported. (Reuters/Pius Erlangga)

With more than 50 years of restricted media access, one of the least covered armed conflicts in the world is the long-simmering struggle between Indonesia's military and the secessionist Free Papua Movement. Under Indonesia's seven successive post-independence governments--the early ones led by autocratic strongmen, the recent ones more or less democratically elected--the world has been deprived of details of the persistent low-intensity battle for autonomy playing out in the Papuan provinces.

Blog   |   Nicaragua

Reporters covering Nicaragua waterway project obstructed by lack of information

HKND Group chairman Wang Jing celebrates the start of work on Nicaragua's interoceanic waterway in December. Reporters say little information has been released on the $50 billion project. (AFP/STR)

When Nicaragua began preliminary work on an interoceanic waterway designed to handle ships too big for the Panama Canal, some of the foreign correspondents who had flown in to cover the December groundbreaking were left high and dry.

Blog   |   South Sudan

Mission Journal: As South Sudan conflict continues press still suffers

Members of the public visit the office of The Patriot. The paper's former chief editor says critical journalists risk being labeled rebel supporters. (CPJ)

On December 15 last year, fighting that broke out between supporters of South Sudan's President Salva Kiir and Riek Machar--who had been vice president until Kiir fired the entire Cabinet--escalated into a civil war that has increased pressure on an already fragile independent press.

Blog   |   Indonesia

Mission Journal: Window of opportunity to advance press freedom in Indonesia

Jakarta residents read newspapers on a city bench. The election of Widodo has renewed hope that press conditions will improve. (CPJ/Sumit Galhotra)

A sense of optimism seems to be filling the streets of Jakarta after the election of President Joko Widodo, who took office a few weeks ago. Against this backdrop of hope, the Committee to Protect Journalists joined other press freedom and freedom of expression groups for a series of meetings in Indonesia's capital and Bali last week to meet journalists, media advocates, and government ministers.

Blog   |   Egypt

As al-Sisi promises freedom of speech, TV host Youssef is put under investigation

Egypt's President al-Sisi addresses the U.N. General Assembly on September 24. He promised to guarantee freedom of press, but journalists are still imprisoned. (AFP/Jewel Samad)

The Egyptian President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi was given a great platform for his country last week, with a speech at the United Nation's General Assembly in which he said that his "new Egypt" would "guarantee freedom of speech," and his first ever meeting with U.S. President Barack Obama.

September 30, 2014 4:09 PM ET

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Alerts   |   Republic of Congo

Republic of Congo expels another journalist from the country

Cameroonian journalist Elie Smith has been expelled from the Republic of Congo. (Facebook)

Abuja, Nigeria, September 30, 2014--The Committee to Protect Journalists condemns Congolese authorities' decision to expel a Cameroonian journalist from the country. Elie Smith, who was attacked in his home in September, is the second journalist whom authorities have expelled from the Republic of Congo in a week.

Blog   |   Vietnam

Undercover in Vietnam: Exile is high price reporters pay for press freedom

In the third of CPJ's four-part "Undercover in Vietnam" series on press freedom in Vietnam, CPJ Southeast Asia Representative Shawn Crispin interviews a reporter living in exile after challenging the censorship imposed in newsrooms. The final part, to be published Tuesday, reveals how prominent bloggers remain behind bars despite the margin for critical debate opening. The series concludes with recommendations for the Vietnamese government and international bodies.

Newspapers are stacked on a Ho Chi Minh City street. The country's state-run press is heavily censored, reporters say. (AFP/Hoang Dinh Nam)

On December 9, 2012, mainstream journalist and sometimes blogger Pham Doan Trang was arrested while reporting on an anti-China protest in Ho Chi Minh City. She was taken to a rehabilitation camp for commercial sex workers, where she was interrogated by a group of seven officials.

Alerts   |   Republic of Congo

Congo expels critical female journalist

Abuja, Nigeria, September 25, 2014--The Committee to Protect Journalists condemns Congolese authorities' decision to expel a freelance journalist from the country and calls on them to allow her to enter the country and report freely. Before her expulsion, Sadio Kante reported receiving threats in connection with a series of stories she published on the attack of another journalist.

September 25, 2014 3:28 PM ET

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Blog   |   Afghanistan

Free press commitment from both contenders for Afghan presidency

With little good news coming from Afghanistan amid the escalating violence and electoral standoff, here is something that goes against that tide. A coalition of Afghan journalist groups has got both presidential candidates in the disputed runoff election to endorse a 12-article statement of support for Afghanistan's media -- "Commitment of the Candidates of the Presidential Election's Runoff Phase In Support of Free Media and Journalists." Article 1: "I respect the value as an [sic] non-violable principle and pledge to spare no legal measures to promote and protect press freedom and freedom of speech." (The letter is also available in Dari and Pashto.)

Statements   |   Afghanistan

Times correspondent ordered out of Afghanistan

New York, August 20, 2014--The Committee to Protect Journalists condemns the Afghan government's decision to expel and ban New York Times correspondent Matthew Rosenberg from the country. The country's attorney general accused Rosenberg today of publishing a story "considered divisive and contrary to the national interest, security and stability of Afghanistan," according to the New York Times. Rosenberg was ordered to leave the country within 24 hours. The move would mark the first public expulsion of a Western journalist since the fall of the Taliban in 2001, the report said.

August 20, 2014 12:02 PM ET

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