Institute for Press and Society

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Blog   |   Venezuela

In Venezuela, Tal Cual under pressure but not defeated

Copies of Tal Cual are read in Caracas in 2007. The critical Venezuelan newspaper has been forced to downsize in an effort to survive. (AP/Leslie Mazoch)

Tal Cual, one of the few remaining Venezuelan newspapers critical of the government, is so shorthanded there's often no receptionist on hand to let people in. Visitors must bang on the front door until someone in the newsroom notices. That can take a while because there are hardly any editors or journalists left.

Blog   |   Venezuela

News rationed as Venezuela seeks to control newsprint imports

Rolls of donated newsprint are delivered to papers in Caracas. The country's press is struggling to have supplies imported. The shortage has forced the daily Correo del Caroní to cut its page numbers. (AFP/Juan Barreto)

Venezuelan newspapers have traditionally handed out hundreds of courtesy copies in their lobbies and at hotels. But Correo del Caroní, an independent daily in the industrial city of Ciudad Guayana, treats every edition as if it were precious and now gives away just 14 copies, including one to the owner.

Alerts   |   Venezuela

Radio station suspended in Venezuela

Bogotá, August 20, 2014--Venezuelan telecommunications regulator CONATEL shut down a critical radio station on Tuesday after refusing to renew the station's expired transmission license, according to news reports. The move follows CONATEL's suspension on Friday of a critical radio program on another station.

Blog   |   Venezuela

Venezuela tries to suppress reports of economic upheaval

Shoppers flock to stores after the government orders business owners to lower prices. (Reuters/Carlos Garcia Rawlins)

Amid skyrocketing inflation and shortages of basic goods, Venezuelan authorities claim that an "economic war" is being waged against the socialist government of President Nicolás Maduro. The government is striking back by forcing stores to discount prices, by arresting business owners accused of hoarding--and by targeting journalists trying to cover the grim economic news.

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