Case   |   Tanzania

Tanzanian journalist abducted, beaten for Zanzibar election coverage

Unknown assailants abducted Salma Said, a reporter with the Kiswahili-language Mwananchi ("Citizen") newspaper and a correspondent for Germany's international broadcaster Deutsche Welle, shortly after the journalist arrived at Dar es Salaam's Julius Nyerere International Airport on March 18, 2016, according to news reports and a statement she made to the Tanzania Human Rights Defenders Coalition (THRD). Said's abductors released her on March 20, a representative of THRD told CPJ.

March 22, 2016 3:44 PM ET

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Alerts   |   Tanzania

Tanzania imposes permanent ban on weekly newspaper

New York, January 21, 2016--The Committee to Protect Journalists calls on authorities in Tanzania to end their harassment of the weekly newspaper Mawio. The Kiswahili-language newspaper was permanently banned from publishing in print and online Friday and two of its editors were briefly detained, according to reports.

Blog   |   Tanzania

Tanzania's press wait to see if new president will reform troubling media laws

Tanzania's new president, John Pombe Magufuli, right, and outgoing president, Jakaya Kikwete. Several of the country's journalists say they hope Magufuli will reform repressive press laws. (Reuters/Emmanuel Herman)

Elections in Tanzania passed smoothly in October, but several local journalists and a media lawyer told me the spectre of anti-press laws is casting a pall over critical reporting in the country and that hopes for legal reform under the newly elected President John Pombe Magufuli remain muted.

December 15, 2015 12:48 PM ET

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Alerts   |   Tanzania

Tanzania bans circulation of regional weekly

The home page of The East African's website, whose print version has been banned from circulation in Tanzania. (The East African)

Nairobi, January 27, 2015--Tanzanian authorities banned circulation of the privately owned regional weekly The East African on January 21, citing the newspaper's lack of registration, according to news reports. Local journalists said they believed the paper was shut because of its critical coverage of the government.

Attacks on the Press   |   Kenya, South Sudan, Tanzania, Uganda

Advertising and Censorship in East Africa's Press

The printed word is thriving in parts of Africa, but advertisers' clout means they can often quietly control what is published. By Tom Rhodes

Kenyans read election coverage in the Mathare slum in Nairobi, the capital, on March 9, 2013. One reason that advertising revenue trumps circulation for East Africa's newspapers is that readers often share papers to save money. (Reuters/Goran Tomasevic)
Kenyans read election coverage in the Mathare slum in Nairobi, the capital, on March 9, 2013. One reason that advertising revenue trumps circulation for East Africa's newspapers is that readers often share papers to save money. (Reuters/Goran Tomasevic)

Attacks on the Press   |   Tanzania

Attacks on the Press in 2013: Tanzania

As public dissent grew in the lead-up to the 2015 presidential and parliamentary elections, attacks and threats against journalists rose. Police were believed to be the perpetrators in nearly a third of the cases. Unidentified assailants brutally attacked a veteran journalist in March, but authorities had not identified the motive, attackers, or mastermind in late year. The increase in threats and attacks occurred alongside a backdrop of anti-press legislation. CPJ identified 17 repressive media-related statutes, including a ban on publications the government considers seditious. For five years, Tanzanian authorities have pledged to address the legislation, but no changes had taken place in late year. CPJ found that the laws were used to induce self-censorship in the independent press. One paper, the critical weekly MwanaHalisi, was silenced indefinitely under the 1976 Newspaper Act.

February 12, 2014 2:02 AM ET

Alerts   |   Tanzania

Tanzania suspends two leading newspapers

Nairobi, September 30, 2013--The Committee to Protect Journalists condemns a decision by Tanzanian authorities to suspend two leading private Swahili dailies on accusations of sedition. The government issued a statement on Friday suspending Mwananchi and MTanzania for 14 and 90 days respectively.

Blog   |   Burundi, Gambia, Somalia, Tanzania, Zambia, Zimbabwe

A bid to rid Africa of criminal defamation, sedition laws

The African Union's special rapporteur on freedom of expression and access to information, Commissioner Pansy Tlakula, has launched an auspicious initiative in East Africa to counter criminal defamation and sedition laws. Since independence, authorities and business interests in the East and Horn region have used criminal laws on sedition, libel, and insult--often relics of former, colonial administrations--to silence their critics in the press. "Criminal defamation laws are nearly always used to punish legitimate criticism of powerful people, rather than protect the right to a reputation," Tlakula said in a statement.

July 12, 2013 3:48 PM ET

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Letters   |   Tanzania, USA

Obama should urge promotion of free press in Tanzania

Dear President Obama: Ahead of your first trip to East Africa, we would like to bring to your attention the deteriorating state of press freedom in Tanzania. In your meetings with Tanzanian President Jakaya Kikwete, we ask that you discuss the critical importance of press freedom to economic development and democracy.

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