Zambia

Case   |   Zambia

Zambian police arrest five radio journalists

Police on November 15, 2016, detained five journalists who work for Zambia's private Mano Radio station, before releasing them roughly 17 hours later, pending trial on insult charges, according to a written account the station emailed to the Committee to Protect Journalists on November 18, and a report on the news website Lusaka Times.

Blog   |   Zambia

For Zambia's press, election year brings assaults and shut down orders

Supporters of President Edgar Lungu's party celebrate his re-election in August. The country's press has been harassed during Zambia's election year. (AFP/Dawood Salim)

Zambia's press has come under sustained assault in this election year, with station licenses suspended, journalists harassed or arrested for critical coverage, and one of the country's largest privately owned papers, The Post, being provisionally liquidated in a move that its editors say is political motivated.

Alerts   |   Zambia

Zambia suspends licenses of three broadcasters

Supporters of Edgar Lungu in Lusaka cheer Zambia's electoral commission's announcement that he had narrowly won August 11 presidential elections, August 15, 2016. (Reuters)

New York, August 24, 2016 - Zambian regulators should immediately reinstate the broadcasting licenses of three media outlets it revoked, and police should drop all charges against four media workers arrested when police sealed the offices of the country's largest privately owned television station, the Committee to Protect Journalists said today.

Alerts   |   Zambia

Zambian editors arrested trying to enter newspaper's offices amid tax dispute

Nairobi, June 28, 2016--The editor-in-chief of independent Zambian newspaper The Post was arrested trying to enter his newspaper's offices today, after authorities closed it in a dispute over allegedly unpaid taxes. Fred M'membe, his wife Mutinta, and his deputy managing editor Joseph Mwenda, were released on bail, but face charges of breaking into a building, according to reports.

Alerts   |   Zambia

Journalists arrested in Zambia for publishing allegedly classified documents

New York, July 16, 2015--Zambian authorities have arrested two journalists and accused them of publishing classified documents, according to news reports. The Committee to Protect Journalists condemns the arrests and calls on Zambian authorities to release them immediately.

Blog   |   Zambia

Mission Journal: In Zambia, Sata never fulfilled promise of greater transparency

Taxi drivers read the news of President Michael Sata's death in The Post special edition on October 29, 2014 in Lusaka. (AFP/Chibala Zulu)

"We'll see for ourselves on Friday," was a refrain on the lips of most journalists I met in Lusaka in mid-September, as they speculated on the health of President Michael Sata ahead of their country's opening of parliament, where the leader was due to speak.

Attacks on the Press   |   Bangladesh, China, Ecuador, Egypt, Liberia, Russia, Syria, Turkey, UK, USA, Vietnam, Zambia

CPJ Risk List

Surveillance, restrictive Internet legislation, and cyberattacks compel CPJ to add cyberspace to the list of places trending in the wrong direction. By Maya Taal

Supporters of the Muslim Brotherhood try to push a journalist, center, away from the police academy where ousted President Mohamed Morsi was on trial on the outskirts of Cairo, November 4, 2013. Perhaps nowhere did press freedom decline more dramatically in 2013 than in polarized Egypt. (Reuters/Amr Abdallah Dalsh)

Attacks on the Press   |   Zambia

Attacks on the Press in 2013: Zambia

Promises of a freer media environment by the Patriotic Front, which won election in 2011 after a campaign that pledged greater broadcast media freedom and a law promoting access to information, had yet to be fulfilled by late 2013. Journalists operated cautiously lest they fell afoul of thin-skinned authorities, and staff members at state-owned publications risked early retirement or redeployment into bureaucratic jobs for not toeing the party line. At least five journalists faced criminal charges in 2013; all of them had reported critically on the government. The newly established Independent Broadcasting Authority awarded private broadcast licenses, but its independence was questioned when President Michael Sata revoked certain licenses. Of the country’s three major newspapers, two were state-controlled and the Post, once highly regarded for its independence, supported the ruling party in 2013, leaving few outlets where journalists could report freely. The government targeted at least three critical websites over the year, forcing one of them to repeatedly move servers--a virtual game of cat-and-mouse.

February 12, 2014 2:00 AM ET

Attacks on the Press Press Releases   |   Bangladesh, Ecuador, Egypt, Liberia, Russia, Turkey, Vietnam, Zambia

Press freedom deteriorates in Cyberspace, Egypt, Russia

Risk List underlines mass surveillance, fatalities, and censorship

New York, February 6, 2014--Mass surveillance programs by the U.S. and U.K., as well as restrictive Internet legislation by various governments and a wave of cyberattacks globally, are among the disturbing developments that have landed cyberspace on the Committee to Protect Journalists' Risk List, released today.

February 6, 2014 4:48 PM ET

Case   |   Zambia

Zambian editors charged with publishing false information

Police detained two journalists of the Daily Nation on December 12, 2013, and released them on bail the next day. Richard Sakala, owner and editor of the paper, and Simon Mwanza, the production editor, were charged with "publication of false information with intent to cause public alarm" under Section 67 of the Zambian penal code.

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