Americas

Connecting Cuba: Steps to press freedom

Cuba's journalists, emboldened by President Raúl Castro's call for reforms in 2010, are finding more space for critical comment, but legal limbo caused by outdated and restrictive media laws, harassment and intimidation from authorities, and limited and expensive access to the internet are slowing the island nation's progress toward press freedom. A special report by the Committee to Protect Journalists

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Video: Internet in Cuba
Graphic: How Cubans Get Online
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 AP

Reports   |   Cuba

Connecting Cuba: More space for criticism but restrictions slow press freedom progress

Cuba’s press, emboldened by President Raúl Castro’s call for reforms in 2010, are finding more space for critical comment, but harassment and intimidation from authorities, a legal limbo caused by outdated and restrictive press laws, and limited and expensive access to the internet is slowing the island nation’s progress toward press freedom. A special report by the Committee to Protect Journalists

September 28, 2016 9:00 AM ET

Reports   |   Cuba

Connecting Cuba

About this report

September 28, 2016 9:00 AM ET

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Reports   |   Cuba

Connecting Cuba

Foreword: Contemplating a free press in Cuba

By Ernesto Londoño

A free press, at its best, is the conscience of a nation, an indispensable arbiter of truth and righteousness. When it is doing its job well, a free press unearths unpleasant truths, holds people in power accountable and champions marginalized communities.

September 28, 2016 9:00 AM ET

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Reports   |   Cuba

Connecting Cuba

Executive Summary: Cuba’s media vitally transformed but cautious approach is slowing progress

By Carlos Lauría

A lively blogosphere, an increasing number of news websites carrying investigative reporting and news commentary, and an innovative breed of independent reporters who are critical of, yet still support socialist ideas have vitally transformed Cuba’s media landscape in the past five years.

Reports   |   Cuba

Connecting Cuba

Cuba’s evolving news agenda

At the Argos Theatre in Havana, Yenys Laura Prieto Velazco purchased a ticket for Diez Millones, a popular play about a Cuban family torn apart by the ideological fanaticism of the Cuban revolution and by the father’s departure to the U.S. during the 1980 Mariel boatlift.

Reports   |   Cuba

Connecting Cuba

Staying connected in an offline world

By Alexandra Ellerbeck

For Elaine Díaz Rodríguez, founder of Periodismo de Barrio, internet access in poorly connected Cuba comes at a premium. “Our reporters have less than 10 hours a month of internet access,” she told CPJ during the Latin American Studies Association conference in New York, where she was taking advantage of the hotel Wi-Fi. “Between midnight and 3 a.m. every night, I download information off the internet. It’s already part of the professional culture to bring a flash drive back to Cuba.”

Reports   |   Cuba

Connecting Cuba

Recommendations

The Committee to Protect Journalists offers the following recommendations:

September 28, 2016 9:00 AM ET

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Impact   |   Cuba, Egypt, Ethiopia

CPJ Newsletter: Exhibit of jailed photographer's work moves to Photoville, journalist released from jail, and we join our partners at the UN

October edition

Next stop for exhibit of Shawkan's work: Photoville

A still from the Facebook Live video CPJ conducted at the Shawkan exhibition at the Bronx Documentary Center. (CPJ/Mustafa Hameed)

In mid-September, CPJ partnered with the Bronx Documentary Center to hold an exhibition of photographs taken by Mahmoud Abou Zeid, or Shawkan, a freelance journalist who has been imprisoned in Egypt since August 2013. Many of Shawkan's photos--from protests and celebrations in Tahrir Square to daily life in Cairo--were taken during the Egyptian revolution.

September 21, 2016 3:21 PM ET

Alerts   |   Mexico

Mexican journalist dies from injuries after being shot in Puebla state

Mexico City, September 20, 2016--The Committee to Protect Journalists urged authorities in the central Mexican state of Puebla today to conduct a full and credible investigation into the killing of journalist Aurelio Cabrera Campos, the founder and editorial director of a weekly news magazine, El Gráfico de la Sierra.

September 20, 2016 5:24 PM ET

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Blog   |   Brazil

In Brazil, journalists face injury from violent protests and accusations of bias

A protester takes cover as police throw tear gas during protests in August over the impeachment of Dilma Rousseff. Journalists have been caught in the crossfire of Brazil's political unrest. (AP/Andre Penner)

Felipe Souza was covering an anti-government protest in São Paulo earlier this month when a line of riot police advanced toward him.

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