Iran, Mexico, Poland, Turkey

CPJ Newsletter: January

Turkey releases jailed Iraqi journalist

Iraqi journalist Mohammed Ismael Rasool was released on bail in Turkey after spending 131 days in prison. (AP/Elena Becatoros)

Following months of advocacy by VICE News, CPJ, and other groups, Iraqi journalist Mohammed Ismael Rasool was released from Turkish prison on January 5. Rasool was arrested in August along with his VICE News colleagues, Jake Hanrahan and Philip Pendlebury, while they were reporting from southeastern Diyarbakir province. The three were charged with "aiding a terrorist organization."

January 30, 2016 12:00 PM ET

Alerts   |   Mexico

Critical reporter shot dead in Oaxaca, Mexico

Mexico City, January 26, 2016--The Committee to Protect Journalists urges Mexican authorities to investigate the murder of Marcos Hernández Bautista, including the possibility that he was killed for his work as a journalist, find all those responsible, and bring them to justice.

Reports   |   Bangladesh, Brazil, France, Iraq, Mexico, Somalia, South Sudan, Syria, Turkey, Yemen

Syria, France most deadly countries for the press

Of 69 journalists killed for their work in 2015, 40 percent died at the hands of Islamic militant groups such as Al-Qaeda and Islamic State. More than two-thirds of the total killed were singled out for murder. A CPJ special report by Elana Beiser

Cartoonists Renald Luzier, left, and Patrick Pelloux at a solidarity march in Paris for their colleagues killed in the attack on satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo. In 2015, 28 journalists were killed by Islamic militants. (AFP/Eric Feferberg)

Impact   |   Bangladesh, Colombia, Cuba, Egypt, Mexico, Nepal, Pakistan, Peru, Republic of Congo, Syria, Vietnam

CPJ Newsletter: A year in review

Over the past year, CPJ has documented anti-press violations all over the world, cases of journalists killed, imprisoned, abducted, or threatened in relation to their work. You can see all of our coverage at our website, www.cpj.org.

But here at CPJ Impact we also highlight those times when CPJ has stepped in and advocated for journalists under threat. This year, we made some vital gains in our fight to protect journalists and press freedom.

We know we couldn't have done this without your support. Please continue to join us in our important work.



December 26, 2015 8:30 AM ET

Reports   |   Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Brazil, Colombia, India, Iraq, Mexico, Nigeria, Pakistan, Philippines, Russia, Somalia, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, Syria

Getting Away With Murder

CPJ's 2015 Global Impunity Index spotlights countries where journalists are slain and the killers go free

Published October 8, 2015

The ambush of a convoy in South Sudan and the hacking deaths of bloggers in Bangladesh this year propelled the two nations onto CPJ's Global Impunity Index, which spotlights countries where journalists are murdered and their killers go unpunished. Colombia exited the index as fatal violence against journalists receded further into that country's past.

For the first time since CPJ began compiling the index in 2008, Iraq did not claim the title of worst offender, as Somalia edged into that spot. The shift reflects a steady death toll in Somalia, where one or more journalists have been murdered every year over the past decade, and the government has proved unable or unwilling to investigate the attacks.

Press Releases   |   China, Ecuador, Egypt, Iran, Mexico, Nigeria, Russia

As world leaders take to UNGA stage, CPJ highlights countries of concern

Press freedom records of Egypt, Russia, Iran, China, Nigeria, Mexico, Ecuador

New York, September 25, 2015--Each year, the world's leaders are invited to New York for the United Nations General Assembly, where they are given a platform to speak freely and openly. But while the leaders of many countries enjoy this privilege, their journalists back home are jailed, threatened, attacked, or even killed for reporting the news.

Blog   |   Mexico

'Pedro Canché Law' obscures the real problem in Quintana Roo

Roberto Borge, governor of the Mexican state of Quintana Roo, says a new law is meant to protect journalists, but they say it is a joke. (AP/Israel Leal)

Mayan journalist Pedro Canché spent 271 days in prison on charges of sabotage. Authorities alleged Canché organized protests one year ago against rising water bills in the Zona Maya south of Cancún, in Quintana Roo state, where demonstrators stormed the offices of the local waterworks, CPJ research shows.

September 1, 2015 2:00 PM ET

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Blog   |   Mexico

The murder of Mexican photographer Espinosa has touched a nerve

A protester holds up a photograph of Rubén Espinosa, a journalist who was killed after he fled Veracruz state. Hundreds of journalists, writers, and artists have signed on to a letter calling on the Mexican government to end the cycle of violence in Mexico. (Reuters/Henry Romero)

The July 31 murder of Mexican photographer Rubén Espinosa hit the press freedom community really hard. Espinosa, who was found in an apartment with four female victims--all of them shot in the head--had fled the state of Veracruz in June and sought refuge in Mexico City, where he thought he would be safe from threats and intimidation.

Alerts   |   Mexico

Mexican photojournalist who fled violent Veracruz state murdered in capital

Mexico City, August 3, 2015--The Committee to Protect Journalists condemns the murder of Mexican photojournalist Rubén Espinosa and calls on authorities to investigative all motives in the killing and ensure the perpetrators are held to account. Espinosa, who had fled to the capital from Veracruz state after receiving threats, was found murdered in a Mexico City apartment on Friday, according to news reports.

Alerts   |   Mexico

Journalist found dead in Veracruz, Mexico

New York, July 7, 2015--The Committee to Protect Journalists calls on Mexican authorities in the state of Veracruz to consider journalism as a motive in the death last week of Mexican journalist Juan Mendoza Delgado, investigate the case thoroughly, and ensure the killers are brought to justice.

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