Mexico

Road to justice: Breaking cycle of impunity

Despite increased international attention to the murders of journalists, governments fail to take action to reduce the high rates of targeted violence and impunity, the Committee to Protect Journalists finds. In the past 10 years, 370 journalists were murdered; in 90 percent of cases, there are no convictions. The unchecked, unsolved murders of journalists is one of the greatest threats to press freedom today.
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Alerts   |   Mexico

Journalist found dead in Veracruz, Mexico

New York, July 7, 2015--The Committee to Protect Journalists calls on Mexican authorities in the state of Veracruz to consider journalism as a motive in the death last week of Mexican journalist Juan Mendoza Delgado, investigate the case thoroughly, and ensure the killers are brought to justice.

Statements   |   Mexico

Journalist gunned down outside radio station in Mexico

New York, July 2, 2015--The Committee to Protect Journalists condemns today's murder of Mexican journalist Filadelfo Sánchez Sarmiento in Miahuatlán de Porfirio Díaz, a municipality in the southern state of Oaxaca. Sánchez was shot at about 9:30 a.m. outside the offices of radio station La Favorita 103.3FM La Voz de la Sierra Sur, where he hosted a news program, according to news reports. The journalist had also written for local newspapers, according to reports. Sánchez had received threatening phone calls, reports said, without providing further details.

Statements   |   Mexico

CPJ welcomes release of imprisoned journalist in Mexico

New York, May 29, 2015--The Committee to Protect Journalists welcomes the release today of Mexican journalist Pedro Celestino Canché Herrera, who had been imprisoned on charges of sabotage in the state of Quintana Roo since August. A local court on Thursday declared Canché innocent of the charges and ordered him to be released, Canché's lawyer, Maria Araceli Andrade Tomala, told CPJ.

Blog   |   Mexico

In Mexico, reporters struggle to cover unrest over missing students

Graffiti referring to 43 students who went missing last September is spray painted on a wall in Mexico City as part of protests about their disappearance. Some journalists say they have struggled to cover the case. (Reuters/Tomas Bravo)

Veteran reporter Sergio Ocampo was having a late dinner on September 26 when his editor called about a shooting in the city of Iguala in Guerrero state. Students from the Ayotzinapa teacher training college were apparently among the victims. But when Ocampo, a correspondent for the newspaper La Jornada, called the then-mayor of Iguala, José Luis Abarca, he was told, "Nothing happened." The mayor added, "They came from Ayotzinapa to do their destruction here," Ocampo recalled.

Alerts   |   Mexico

Veracruz journalist shot dead after reporting on oil theft

Mexico City, May 6, 2015--The body of Veracruz radio journalist Armando Saldaña Morales was found on Monday in the neighboring Mexican state of Oaxaca, according to the Oaxaca state attorney general's office and news reports. The journalist had been shot dead, the reports said. The Committee to Protect Journalists condemns the murder and calls on authorities to identify the motive in the killing and ensure the perpetrators are held to account.

Attacks on the Press   |   Mexico, Nigeria, Syria

Broadcasting murder: Militants use media for deadly purpose

A militant uses a mobile phone to film fellow Islamic State fighters taking part in a military parade along the streets of Syria's Raqqa province on June 30, 2014. (Reuters/Stringer)

News of the August 19, 2014, murder of journalist James Foley broke not in the media but instead on Twitter. News organizations faced the agonizing questions of how to report on the killing and what portions of the video to show. If a group or individual commits an act of violence, and then films it, how can traditional news organizations cover it without amplifying the propaganda message?

Attacks on the Press   |   Mexico, Pakistan

Between conflict and stability: Journalists in Pakistan and Mexico cope with everyday threats

By Daniel DeFraia

Mexican journalists hold photos of killed colleagues during a demonstration in Mexico City on February 23, 2014, against kidnapping and murder of Veracruz reporter Gregorio Jimenez de la Cruz. (Reuters/Henry Romero)

The Pakistani journalist knew the risk, but he wrote the story about the militants anyway. Years earlier he had been shot, after reporting on another taboo subject, but for him the freelance work was thrilling, even after he had to marry his girlfriend in secret and flee Pakistan without her--and still now, since the nightmares began.

Letters   |   Mexico

CPJ to Mexican president: case of jailed journalist violates free expression

Dear President Peña Nieto: The Committee to Protect Journalists is writing to express its concern at the continued detention of an independent journalist and Mayan activist in the Mexican state of Quintana Roo. Pedro Celestino Canché Herrera has been imprisoned since August 30, 2014, when he was arrested by state security forces and charged with sabotage.

April 20, 2015 12:24 PM ET

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Blog   |   Mexico

Investigative journalist Carmen Aristegui fired from Mexican radio station

Carmen Aristegui speaks to the press outside MVS Radio in Mexico City on March 16. The investigative journalist was dismissed after demanding that the station reinstate two reporters it fired last week. (AFP/Ronaldo Schemidt)

She exposed government corruption with investigative reporting that made international headlines, helped launch the Mexicoleaks whistleblower website, and was voted second most powerful woman in the country last year by Forbes Mexico, but Carmen Aristegui, one of the country's most popular radio journalists, has been fired from MVS Radio after demanding that the privately owned station reinstate two investigative reporters.

Alerts   |   Mexico

Mexican editor flees after gunmen abduct and beat him

Mexico City, February 6, 2015--The editor of a Mexican daily in Matamoros has fled the city after gunmen abducted him from his office on Wednesday and beat him, prompting the paper to say it will stop covering violence. The abduction came after the newspaper published stories and photos on drug cartel violence near the U.S.-Mexico border, according to news reports.

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