USA

Preserving the free press in the US

CPJ examines the challenges journalists face in a changing environment for the news media. Nine outlets are denied access to an informal White House press secretary briefing. Online trolls, emboldened by the president's anti-press rhetoric, harass reporters. As the debate over "fake news" in the U.S. and Europe continues, journalists are jailed and media outlets are closed around the world for publishing news autocratic governments deem "false" or "fake."

Reporters must be able to protect sources
Video: Press arrests at Standing Rock
AFP

Case   |   USA

Noose left at U.S. newspaper's office door

On April 21, 2017, someone left a noose on the doorstep of The Sacramento Valley Mirror, a semiweekly newspaper in Willows, California, newspaper staff told the Committee to Protect Journalists.

April 28, 2017 12:20 PM ET

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Attacks on the Press   |   USA

Fighting for the Truth

Journalists have a huge amount of work to do
By Christiane Amanpour

Never in a million years did I expect to find myself appealing for the freedom and safety of American journalists at home. Despite the hostile rhetoric of the U.S. presidential campaign, I hoped that after becoming president-elect, Donald Trump would change his approach to the press.

Attacks on the Press   |   USA

Case in Point

A journalist details one fight over records requests in the United States
By Michael Pell

In December 2010, Robin Gordon faced an ultimatum. She had found that a debt collection company had purchased a $291 tax lien on an apartment she owned in Atlanta, Georgia, after her mortgage company failed to pay a small portion of her Fulton County taxes five years earlier. Now, she could either pay the debt collection company $8,200, a 2,700 percent increase, or the sheriff's office would auction her apartment to pay the debt.

Attacks on the Press   |   USA

Thwarting Freedom of Information

Agencies exploit every loophole to evade disclosure requirements
By Jason Leopold

On December 13, 2016, I filed a Freedom of Information Act lawsuit against the FBI seeking a wide range of documents about a series of highly controversial decisions the bureau made in the weeks leading up to the U.S. presidential election that Democratic lawmakers and supporters of Hillary Clinton have claimed shifted support to her opponent, Donald Trump.

Attacks on the Press   |   USA

What Is the Worst-Case Scenario?

American journalists grapple with the Trump presidency
By Alan Huffman

The word "unprecedented" is often used to describe Donald Trump's antipathy toward the American media, as it is of many of his other approaches to governance.

Blog   |   USA

CPJ joins Fly Don't Spy campaign to protect journalists and their sources

(Access Now)

Over the past several months, the Committee to Protect Journalists has raised concerns over U.S. border agents' use of secondary searches of journalists and their devices at U.S. borders, and government proposals to require travelers to hand over social media account passwords as a condition of entry to the U.S. That is why today CPJ joined with 29 organizations to launch the Fly Don't Spy campaign. CPJ supports the rights of journalists to protect confidential information when traveling and is concerned about proposals that could undermine these values.

Blog   |   China, Germany, Internet, Russia, USA

Deciding who decides which news is fake

White House press secretary Sean Spicer talks to the media during the daily briefing. President Trump and his administration have accused critical outlets of being fake news. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Authorities decry the proliferation of misinformation and propaganda on the internet, and technology companies are wrestling with various measures to combat fake news. But addressing the problem without infringing on the right to free expression and the free flow of information is extremely thorny.

Blog   |   USA

CPJ calls on Homeland Security secretary to reject password proposal

A traveler arrives at New York's JFK airport. Suggestions by the Homeland Security Secretary that passengers be asked for social media passwords would impact journalists. (Reuters/Brendan McDermid)

The Committee to Protect Journalists is concerned by Secretary of Homeland Security John Kelly's suggestion to a committee hearing that the U.S. could request social media profile and password information as a condition to entering the country. Such requirements would have an impact on journalists by undermining their ability to protect sources and work product, and would represent an escalation of the press freedom challenges journalists face at U.S. borders.

Letters   |   USA

Coalition calls for charges to be dropped against Standing Rock journalists

CPJ and a coalition of other organizations request that the Morton County State's Attorney's Office drop the charges against journalists arrested during protests over the Dakota Access Pipeline or justify the arrests of reporters in the course of their work.

Statements   |   USA

Reporters barred from U.S. press secretary briefing

Reporters gather after being denied access to an informal White House press secretary briefing. (AFP/Brendan Smialowski)

New York, February 24, 2017--The Committee to Protect Journalists is concerned by the decision today to bar nine news outlets from an informal briefing known as "a gaggle" by President Donald Trump's White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer. Separately, at the Conservative Party Action Conference in Maryland today, Trump said that journalists should not be allowed to use anonymous sources, and accused the press of producing "fake news," according to reports.

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