China

China tightens controls another notch

Chinese regulators issue a sweeping ban on websites' original news programs, soon after a website runs a headline with a typographical error. More information and internet controls are expected under Xu Lin, the new head of the Cyberspace Administration of China. A Hong Kong magazine publisher and an editor are sentenced to prison in mainland China for "running an illegal business." Two journalists are detained for "picking quarrels and provoking trouble," weeks after two other writers are sentenced to more than 10 years in prison for "subversion."

Data:Journalists imprisoned in 2015
AP

Alerts   |   China

China detains publisher of human rights news website

New York, November 29, 2016--Chinese authorities should immediately and unconditionally release Huang Qi, publisher of the human rights news website 64 Tianwang, the Committee to Protect Journalists said today. Police in China's southwest Sichuan Province detained Huang last night, amid an intensified crackdown on online journalists and bloggers who report on protests and human rights abuses.

November 29, 2016 5:32 PM ET

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Alerts   |   China

Editor of human rights news website detained in China

New York, November 28, 2016 - Chinese authorities should immediately release Liu Feiyue, the editor and founder of the human rights news website Civil Rights & Livelihood Watch, known in China as Minsheng Guancha, the Committee to Protect Journalists said today. Liu's arrest occurred amid increasing efforts by China to silence journalists and bloggers who cover protests and human rights abuses.

November 28, 2016 5:18 PM ET

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Blog   |   China

In China, foreign correspondents continue to face harassment, restrictions

Conditions for foreign correspondents in China remain difficult, with journalists reporting cases of harassment, surveillance, and restrictions on where they can work, according to findings by the Foreign Correspondents' Club of China.

November 15, 2016 5:00 PM ET

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Case   |   China

Hong Kong journalist attacked by protesters

On October 26, 2016, a Hong Kong journalist was attacked by a group of protesters while covering a rally outside of the Legislative Council building.

October 27, 2016 2:28 PM ET

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Blog   |   China, Ivory Coast, Mexico, Pakistan

Protecting journalists who cover corruption is good for the bottom line

Number of journalists who covered corruption who were killed in relation to their work since 1992, by country. (Mehdi Rahmati/CPJ research)

Corruption is one of the most dangerous beats for journalists, and one of the most important for holding those in power to account. There is growing international recognition that corruption is also one of the biggest impediments to poverty reduction and good governance. This is why journalists on this beat must be protected, including by multilateral lending institutions such as the World Bank and International Monetary Fund, which just concluded their annual meetings in Washington D.C.

October 13, 2016 1:34 PM ET

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Alerts   |   China, Taiwan

Taiwanese journalists barred from UN aviation agency assembly

New York, September 26, 2016 - The International Civil Aviation Organization should allow journalists to cover its events regardless of where they are from or where their employers are located, the Committee to Protect Journalists said today. The UN agency, which is responsible for setting global safety standards, yesterday refused to accredit two journalists for Taiwanese media to cover the organization's 39th Triennial Assembly, according to their employers.

September 26, 2016 4:38 PM ET

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Alerts   |   China

Chinese police detain, assault Hong Kong journalists for covering protest

A woman shows footage on her mobile phone she says shows residents of Wukan, in China's Guangdong province, detained by police, September 14, 2016. (Reuters/Damir Salgoj)

New York, September 15, 2016 - Chinese authorities should launch a credible, independent investigation into allegations police assaulted journalists and allow reporters to do their work, including covering protests, without restriction, the Committee to Protect Journalists said today. Police in China's southern Guangdong province last night assaulted and detained five journalists from Hong Kong-based news outlets, their employers reported, and prevented many others from approaching a village that has recently been the site of protests.

Alerts   |   China

Chinese journalist beaten in detention, lawyer says

New York, September 1, 2016 - Chinese authorities should credibly investigate allegations that prison guards beat online journalist Lu Yuyu in custody and ensure that he gets proper medical treatment, the Committee to Protect Journalists said today.

September 1, 2016 5:32 PM ET

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Blog   |   China

Criticism and jokes off limits ahead of G20 summit in Hangzhou, China

An empty refrigerator at a convenience store at West Lake, in Hangzhou, China, on August 31 bears a sign that reads 'During G20, beverages and dairy products are not allowed to be purchased and are sold out. Thanks.' Authorities have ordered the media not to report on inconveniences caused by the summit. (Reuters/Aly Song)

The city of Yuyao, in China's Zhejiang province, is 70 miles away from Hangzhou, where leaders of the world's 20 leading economies will gather September 4 and 5 for the annual G20 summit. Nonetheless, on August 26, democracy activist You Jingyou and his wife were subject to extra security checks at the train station in Yuyao, where they went to board a train to their home of Fuzhou, in Fujian province--a train that would not even pass by Hangzhou.

Blog   |   China

As Beijing tightens grip on Hong Kong media, mainland journalists suffer

A cover of Time magazine on display in Hong Kong, July 22, 2016, features portraits of Chinese leader Xi Jinping and former leader Mao Zedong. (AP/Vincent Yu)

On August 1, prominent Chinese human rights lawyer Wang Yu, who had been detained incommunicado for over a year, reemerged--with an unusual twist on an old script. Wang gave a TV interview in which she renounced her legal work and accused foreign forces of using her to "attack" and "smear" the Chinese government; the report claimed she'd just been released on bail. The public statement of guilt without trial is part of an established pattern in China, with more than a dozen such "confessions" delivered by human rights activists, journalists, and writers. But this time, the state-owned China Central Television (CCTV) failed to play a role. Instead, the interview was carried by a website affiliated with the Hong Kong newspaper Oriental Daily.

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