Alerts   |   China

Former Hong Kong editor in critical condition after attack

Protesters urge police to apprehend the perpetrators of an attack on Hong Kong journalist Kevin Lau Chun-to. (Reuters/Tyrone Siu)

Hong Kong, February 26, 2014--The Committee to Protect Journalists condemns today's attack on a journalist in Hong Kong and calls on authorities to conduct a thorough and efficient investigation and ensure the perpetrators are brought to justice. Kevin Lau Chun-to is now in critical condition, according to news reports.

Attacks on the Press   |   China, USA

How the United States' Spying Strengthens China's Hand

The scope of the National Security Agency's digital surveillance raises doubts about the U.S. commitment to freedom of expression online. By Joel Simon

Demonstrators march outside of the U.S. Capitol in Washington on October 26, 2013, to demand that Congress investigate the NSA's mass surveillance programs. (AP/Jose Luis Magana)

Attacks on the Press   |   Brazil, China, Ethiopia, India, Indonesia, Liberia, Pakistan, Poland, Somalia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Syria, UK, Uganda

Putting Press Freedom at the Heart of Anti-Poverty Efforts

Economists and political scientists acknowledge that journalism is vital to development and democracy. By Robert Mahoney

Pakistani investigative journalist Umar Cheema has exposed corruption in Parliament. (AFP/Aamir Qu)

Attacks on the Press   |   Bangladesh, China, Ecuador, Egypt, Liberia, Russia, Syria, Turkey, UK, USA, Vietnam, Zambia

CPJ Risk List

Surveillance, restrictive Internet legislation, and cyberattacks compel CPJ to add cyberspace to the list of places trending in the wrong direction. By Maya Taal

Supporters of the Muslim Brotherhood try to push a journalist, center, away from the police academy where ousted President Mohamed Morsi was on trial on the outskirts of Cairo, November 4, 2013. Perhaps nowhere did press freedom decline more dramatically in 2013 than in polarized Egypt. (Reuters/Amr Abdallah Dalsh)

Attacks on the Press   |   China

Journalists in Hong Kong and Taiwan Battle Beijing's Influence

Media owners' reluctance to draw China's disfavor imperils the ability of the Hong Kong and Taiwanese press to play a watchdog role. By a CPJ Contributor

Popular protests like this one in Taipei on January 1, 2013, helped derail a plan for a wealthy business tycoon with interests in China to buy Taiwan's largest newspaper. (AFP/Mandy Cheng)
Popular protests like this one in Taipei on January 1, 2013, helped derail a plan for a wealthy business tycoon with interests in China to buy Taiwan's largest newspaper. (AFP/Mandy Cheng)

Attacks on the Press   |   China

Attacks on the Press in 2013: China

Despite expectations for greater transparency after President Xi Jinping took office in March, Beijing continued to try to suppress information on a broad range of issues. A CPJ report in March found that the government struggled to cope with ever more pervasive digital platforms that Chinese citizens used to express themselves. In September, authorities once again tightened social media controls. Under the new rules, people who posted comments deemed libelous and that were reposted 500 or more times faced defamation charges and up to three years in prison. Subsequently, hundreds of social media users including some journalists were arrested although most were released by the end of 2013. China ranked third on CPJ's annual census of journalists imprisoned around the world, behind only Turkey and Iran. Shi Tao, a Chinese journalist who was given a 10-year prison sentence in 2005, the first high-profile conviction for online activity, was released from prison in August, 15 months before the end of his term. CPJ research has shown that most jailed journalists serve their full sentences. A survey by the Foreign Correspondents' Club of China said reporting conditions had worsened over the past year, as the Chinese government "increasingly resorted to threats and intimidation against foreign media."

February 12, 2014 1:36 AM ET


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