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Blog   |   Gambia, Iraq, Russia, USA

Global Magnitsky Act could be powerful weapon against impunity in journalist murders

The funeral of Sergei Magnitsky is held in Moscow on November 20, 2009. The lawyer died in state custody after exposing official corruption. (Reuters/Mikhail Voskresensky)

Last week, the proposed Global Magnitsky Human Rights Accountability Act emerged from the U.S. House Foreign Affairs Committee with approval. The bill was passed by the Senate last year. If passed by the full House of Representatives and signed into law by the president, it has the potential to offer partial redress to one of the most chilling truths facing journalists today: in 90 percent of cases, the murders of journalists go unpunished.

Blog   |   Turkey

Turkey Crackdown Chronicle: Week of May 22

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan and Binali Yildirim, the new head of the ruling Justice and Development Party, pose for cameras at the presidential palace in Ankara, May 22, 2016. (Presidential Pool/AP)

Prison sentences for newspaper editors
Istanbul's 13th Court for Serious Crimes sentenced Eren Keskin and Reyhan Çapan, former editor and news editor, respectively, of the pro-Kurdish daily newspaper Özgür Gündem, to three years and nine months in prison each on charges of spreading terrorist propaganda, the newspaper reported today. Both are free, pending appeal. In the past month, dozens of journalists have taken turns symbolically acting as co-editors of the newspaper to protest the government's persistent judicial harassment of the daily and its editors.

[May 27, 2016]

Blog   |   USA

Why Trump's insults of journalists must be taken seriously

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks to journalists in Nashville, Tennessee, in August 2015. (Reuters/Harrison McClary)

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump has called the mainstream media "crooked" "unfair" "troublemakers" and The New York Times a failing, "SAD!" newspaper "full of boring lies." Individual reporters are "liars" and "bimbos," according to his tweets.

May 18, 2016 12:05 PM ET

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Blog   |   Turkey

Turkey Crackdown Chronicle: Week of May 15

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan speaks to local officials at the presidential palace in Ankara, May 4, 2016. (Adem Altan/AFP)

Veteran columnist pleads 'not guilty' to charges of insulting Erdoğan
Veteran journalist Hasan Cemal, a columnist for the news website T24 and a founder of the news website P24, today pleaded not guilty to charges of insulting Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan at Istanbul's 12th Criminal Court of First Instance, T24 reported.

Blog   |   Hungary

UN review of Hungary shows country 'treats human rights as a public enemy'

Hungary's Prime Minister, Viktor Orbán, talks to the press outside the EU leaders' summit in March. The country's poor press freedom record and policies on asylum seekers have been criticized by the U.N. (AFP/John Thys)

On May 9, a stern review of Hungary's conduct in human rights issues and press freedom was released at the United Nations Human Rights Council. The report, drafted by the Working Group on the Universal Periodic Review, listed concerns from U.N. member states about the controversial policies of Viktor Orbán's government on asylum seekers and hate speech, as well as the poor state of press freedom.

Blog   |   Tanzania

Tanzania cuts live parliamentary coverage, ending vital news source for citizens

President John Magufuli, pictured after winning Tanzania's election last year. His party has halted the live coverage of parliament. (Reuters/Emmanuel Herman)

On April 19, the live coverage of proceedings in the Tanzanian parliament ended as a government decision to halt the service went into effect. The move, announced by Information Minister Nape Nnauye in January, has led to protests from the opposition party and journalists' groups, who said they view the decision to stop live broadcasts of parliamentary debates as tantamount to censorship.

Blog   |   Internet, Security

How SecureDrop helps CPJ protect journalists

CPJ's SecureDrop instance sits in the organization's San Francisco office prior to being transported to New York. (Geoffrey King)

CPJ is proud to announce our instance of SecureDrop, the anonymous submission system engineered to resist even nation-state surveillance. In a time of unprecedented, technologically-mediated threats to journalism both online and offline, CPJ's adoption of this state-of-the-art system will help us protect journalists who need help the most. There has never been a safer way to tell CPJ about press freedom violations anywhere in the world -- or request direct support when you're under fire for your reporting.

May 12, 2016 7:00 AM ET

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Blog   |   Turkey

Turkey Crackdown Chronicle: Week of May 8

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan addresses local officials at his palace in Ankara on March 20, 2016. Erdoğan said Russian and U.S. arms were finding their way to Kurdish groups Turkey classes as terrorist organizations. (Murat Cetinmuhurdar/Pool/AP)

Police detain two men on suspicion of plotting attack on newspaper
Police detained two men suspected of planning to attack the printing house of leading pro-government daily Sabah today, the newspaper reported. According to Sabah, suspects Hasan K and Bahri T were on a motorcycle with no license plates, wearing two sets of clothes, one over another, and were in possession of masks, gloves, a shotgun, and five shells when police apprehended them near the newspaper's printing plant.

Blog   |   Egypt

Egyptian government clash with Journalists Syndicate marks turning point in censorship fight

Journalists carry Yehia Qallash, head of the Egyptian Journalists Syndicate, at a protest against restrictions on the press in Cairo on May 4. (Reuters)

A standoff this week between Egyptian authorities and the country's influential Journalists Syndicate could mark a turning point in the fight for media control that has raged since before President Abdel Fattah el-Sisi took office.

Blog   |   Japan

Abe administration throttles media independence, journalists and UN say

Reporters surround Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe in February. Journalists say control of the media has been tightened since he came to power. (AFP/Jiji Press)

Late in 2015, the Japanese government asked David Kaye, the U.N. special rapporteur on the right to freedom of opinion and expression, to reschedule a visit planned for December. At the time, some news outlets speculated that the administration of Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, under criticism for rising threats to free expression, was trying to avoid U.N. scrutiny.

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