CPJ Blog

Press Freedom News and Views

Americas

Blog   |   USA

CPJ testimony on threats to press freedom at Tom Lantos Human Rights Commission

Today, at a hearing before the Tom Lantos Human Rights Commission, CPJ Advocacy Director Courtney C. Radsch gave testimony on the threats to freedom of expression.

July 14, 2016 3:38 PM ET

Tags:

Blog   |   Mexico

In Oaxaca, reporters covering teachers' union protests face violence, threats

A protester from the CNTE crouches near a barricade during clashes with riot police in Nochixtlán. Journalists covering the unrest say they have been harassed and attacked. (Reuters/Jorge Luis Plata)

The atmosphere in Nochixtlán, a small, rural community in Mexico's southern state of Oaxaca, was tense on June 20. The day before, members of a dissident teachers' union had clashed with federal and state police while protesting education reform. Shots were fired and, by the end of the day, nine people had died and dozens more were wounded.

Blog   |   Security, USA

Be prepared: steps to staying safe while covering US political party conventions

A confrontation outside a Trump rally in San Diego in May. Journalists covering the Republican and Democratic conventions are advised to take security precautions. (AP/Lenny Ignelzi)

The U.S. political party conventions in Cleveland and Philadelphia this summer carry the risk of civil unrest. While protests have long occurred both inside and outside of convention venues, security experts and political commentators have said this year's gatherings have the potential for unrest not seen since in the U.S. since the Vietnam war-era clashes in Chicago during the Democratic Party convention in 1968

July 12, 2016 11:21 AM ET

Tags:

Blog   |   Mexico

In Mexico, covering state elections brings risk of threats and violence

Miguel Angel Mancera, the mayor of Mexico City, casts his vote on June 5. Journalists were threatened and harassed in the lead up to state elections. (Reuters/Edgard Garrido)

As the June 5 elections approached, the anonymous phone calls to Mexican journalist Pedro Canché became more frequent and more ominous. "The Caribbean is a big sea, you'll never be found," one said. "I hope you've written a will," said another. A third caller told Canché, "Remember what happened to Rubén Espinosa," referring to the photographer murdered in Mexico City on July 31 last year. "Do you want that to happen to you too?"

Blog   |   Gambia, Iraq, Russia, USA

Global Magnitsky Act could be powerful weapon against impunity in journalist murders

The funeral of Sergei Magnitsky is held in Moscow on November 20, 2009. The lawyer died in state custody after exposing official corruption. (Reuters/Mikhail Voskresensky)

Last week, the proposed Global Magnitsky Human Rights Accountability Act emerged from the U.S. House Foreign Affairs Committee with approval. The bill was passed by the Senate last year. If passed by the full House of Representatives and signed into law by the president, it has the potential to offer partial redress to one of the most chilling truths facing journalists today: in 90 percent of cases, the murders of journalists go unpunished.

Blog   |   USA

Why Trump's insults of journalists must be taken seriously

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks to journalists in Nashville, Tennessee, in August 2015. (Reuters/Harrison McClary)

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump has called the mainstream media "crooked" "unfair" "troublemakers" and The New York Times a failing, "SAD!" newspaper "full of boring lies." Individual reporters are "liars" and "bimbos," according to his tweets.

May 18, 2016 12:05 PM ET

Also Available in
Español

Tags:

Blog   |   Brazil, Internet

Cybercrime proposals risk undermining Brazil's progress in securing free and open Internet

A cell phone records President Dilma Rousseff as she reacts to the impeachment vote. Amid Brazil's political crisis, a cybercrime bill with troubling implications for press freedom is being proposed. (AFP/Christophe Simon)

Two years ago, Brazil passed Marco Civil da Internet, a landmark piece of Internet civil rights legislation that made the country an international reference in digital rights. But its legacy is under threat from a cybercrime proposal that could radically change key aspects of the framework and threaten free speech online.

Blog

CPJ joins call for World Bank to adopt human rights policy

The Committee to Protect Journalists has joined Social Justice Connection and other press freedom and human rights groups in calling on the World Bank to adopt a human rights policy at its annual spring meeting in Washington D.C. In a letter to the president of World Bank, Jim Yong Kim, the groups urged the bank to consider human rights and freedom of expression in the drafting of its social protection policy, which is due to be completed this summer.

April 18, 2016 1:59 PM ET

Tags:

Blog   |   Venezuela

After Venezuelan elections, Globovisión shows more defiant stance

The control room of Venezuelan station Globovisión. Since congressional elections in December, the news outlet has taken a tougher stance in its coverage. (AFP/Miguel Gutierrez)

When Venezuela's opposition broke the ruling party's 17-year stranglehold on power by winning control of congress in December, the political earthquake created editorial aftershocks at the 24-hour news station Globovisión.

Blog   |   Cuba

As US-Cuba relations thaw, what's next for the island's independent press?

A Cuban watches Barack Obama give a speech about resuming diplomatic ties with Cuba. The U.S. President is due to visit the island-nation in March. (AFP/Yamil Lage)

"Our hope is that President Obama will meet journalists working for the alternative media, not just to cover his visit, but to start a dialogue," said Elaine Díaz Rodríguez, director of Periodismo de Barrio (Neighborhood Journalism) a website focusing on climate change and the impact of natural disasters on local communities. Díaz, who last year became the first Cuban journalist to receive a Nieman fellowship at Harvard University, said such an encounter with Obama would validate journalism in the island nation. "It won't resolve our problems, but it will boost our legitimacy and reduce our vulnerabilities," she told CPJ on the phone from Havana.

Social Media

View all »