CPJ Blog

Press Freedom News and Views

Americas

Blog   |   USA

Transition to Trump: When a president-elect tweets, the trolls take aim

As a new presidential administration prepares to take over the U.S., CPJ examines the status of press freedom, including the challenges journalists face from surveillance, harassment, limited transparency, the questioning of libel laws, and other factors.

Crowds record Donald Trump on their phones during a rally in April. Journalists say they have been targeted by online trolls for their coverage of Trump. (AP/Steven Senne)

Blog   |   USA

Transition to Trump: Reporters must be allowed to protect their sources

Reporters surround James Goodale as he arrives for a court hearing on The New York Times in 1971. The First Amendment attorney has represented The New York Times in landmark cases that helped shape legal protection for journalists. (AP/Davis)

Blog   |   USA

Transition to Trump: Why U.S. needs to be global leader in protecting strong encryption

As a new presidential administration prepares to take over the U.S., CPJ examines the status of press freedom, including the challenges journalists face from surveillance, harassment, limited transparency, the questioning of libel laws, and other factors.

Protesters gather outside a district court in March 2016 after Apple was ordered to retrieve encrypted data from the phone of a suspected gunman. Civil rights groups say forcing companies to weaken encryption endangers privacy. (AFP/Frederic J. Brown)

Blog   |   USA

Transition to Trump: What Obama's Freedom of Information legacy means for press

As a new presidential administration prepares to take over the U.S., CPJ examines the status of press freedom, including the challenges journalists face from surveillance, harassment, limited transparency, the questioning of libel laws, and other factors.

President Obama signs the Freedom of Information Improvement Act of 2016. Journalists say there are still delays in accessing information. (AFP/Brendan Smialowski)

Blog   |   Guatemala

Searching for answers in murder cases amid violence and corruption in Guatemala

Officials inspect a crime scene in Guatemala City in 2013. High rates of street crime and violence make it hard to determine if victims are targeted for their work as journalists. (AFP/Johan Ordonez)

On June 25, unidentified assailants shot and killed Álvaro Aceituno López, director of Radio Ilusión in Coatepeque, a town in southeastern Guatemala. López often criticized local government officials when presenting the news and during guest appearances on other programs. But to date, CPJ has been unable to determine if Aceituno was killed for his work as a journalist or if he was a street-crime casualty in a country plagued by gangs, drug traffickers, and one of the highest homicide rates in the world.

Blog   |   USA

Transition to Trump: First Amendment attorney Floyd Abrams on Trump's power over libel laws

As a new presidential administration prepares to take over the U.S., CPJ examines the status of press freedom, including the challenges journalists face from surveillance, harassment, limited transparency, the questioning of libel laws, and other factors.

President-elect Donald Trump meets with President Barack Obama in November as the new presidential administration prepares to take over the U.S. (AP/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Blog   |   Panama

Jailed Dutch reporter Ornstein says Panama failed to inform him of legal proceedings

Dutch journalist Okke Ornstein pictured in Panama's Renacer prison, where he is being held for criminal defamation. (CPJ/Jan-Albert Hootsen)

A faint smile appears on Okke Ornstein's face as he recalls what happened last summer, when he traveled with a group of refugees through Europe to document their trip for a Dutch radio broadcaster.

December 13, 2016 12:00 AM ET

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Blog   |   USA

Security risk for sources as U.S. border agents stop and search journalists

Travelers wait for a security check at Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport in November. Journalists traveling to the U.S. can face searches that can risk the confidentiality of their sources. (Alex Wong/Getty Images/AFP)

French-American photojournalist Kim Badawi did not go home to Texas for Thanksgiving this year. He didn't want to risk a repeat of November last year, when he says U.S. border security detained him at Miami airport and interrogated him in minute detail about his private life, political views, and journalistic sources.

Blog   |   China, Ivory Coast, Mexico, Pakistan

Protecting journalists who cover corruption is good for the bottom line

Number of journalists who covered corruption who were killed in relation to their work since 1992, by country. (Mehdi Rahmati/CPJ research)

Corruption is one of the most dangerous beats for journalists, and one of the most important for holding those in power to account. There is growing international recognition that corruption is also one of the biggest impediments to poverty reduction and good governance. This is why journalists on this beat must be protected, including by multilateral lending institutions such as the World Bank and International Monetary Fund, which just concluded their annual meetings in Washington D.C.

Blog   |   Brazil

In Brazil, journalists face injury from violent protests and accusations of bias

A protester takes cover as police throw tear gas during protests in August over the impeachment of Dilma Rousseff. Journalists have been caught in the crossfire of Brazil's political unrest. (AP/Andre Penner)

Felipe Souza was covering an anti-government protest in São Paulo earlier this month when a line of riot police advanced toward him.

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