CPJ Blog

Press Freedom News and Views


Blog   |   India

In India, politics of beef and rising intolerance threaten press freedom

A protest in Delhi over the murder of a Muslim farmer killed over claims he slaughtered a cow. Violence over the tightening of beef laws in parts of India is having an impact on some journalists. (AP/Altaf Qadri)

The violence over the tightening of laws banning the consumption of beef in parts of India and debate over the reach of a right-wing Hindu agenda are having an impact on press freedom. An editor who wrote about the benefits of beef was fired last week, journalists have received death threats from extremist groups, and writers have handed back awards in protest of what they see as the government's failure to address a rising tide of intolerance.

Blog   |   China

In China, harsh penalties for 'false news' make it harder for reporters to work

China's journalists and bloggers, already under threat of persecution, face new risks from November 1, when amendments to the country's criminal law come into effect. Under the amendment, passed in August by legislative body the National People's Congress, those convicted of spreading false news about disasters or epidemics will face harsh penalties.

October 30, 2015 5:29 PM ET


Blog   |   Vietnam

Poor trade-off: Jailed journalists released into exile as Vietnam pushes for weapons deal

Vietnamese blogger Nguyen Van Hai arrives in Los Angeles in October 2014 after being released from jail and forced into exile. The U.S. says trade deals will depend on human rights but press freedom conditions remain poor in Vietnam. (AFP/Robyn Beck)

In September, Vietnamese blogger Ta Phong Tan was released after serving three years of a 10-year prison term and was immediately flown to Los Angeles. In October 2014 Tan's colleague Nguyen Van Hai, whom she co-founded the Free Journalists Club with in 2007 and who was also imprisoned for his work, followed the same route.

Blog   |   China

Cap and trade: How China maintains positive coverage with limit on negative news

President Xi Jinping and his wife join the Obamas at the White House on September 25. The press in China has been issued directives to limit negative reports about the U.S. visit. (AP/Andrew Harnik)

China's President Xi Jinping announced a major cap-and-trade program on carbon emissions at the White House today, but a cap on press freedom back home has long been in place.

Blog   |   India

Indian journalist named on hit list as threats against critical voices escalate

A vigil for rationalist scholar M.M. Kalburgi, who was shot dead earlier this year. Threats against writers and journalists from the rationalist school of thought are rising in India. (AP/Aijaz Rahi)

"These people will kill you," Nikhil Wagle, a prominent journalist in India, told me as we discussed reports of him being named as a target by a member of a hard-line Hindu group who is being questioned by police over the murder of a writer.

Blog   |   China

Harassment in China: Foreign correspondents' club releases report

From being followed by plain clothes policemen to being locked in a hotel conference room, the life of an international journalist in China comes with its challenges. The Foreign Correspondents' Club of China released details on September 13 of six cases of members being harassed by authorities between March and August this year.

September 17, 2015 1:03 PM ET


Blog   |   China

In China, last of the liberals under pressure to toe party line

News crews film as Chinese President Xi Jinping arrives for a military parade in Beijing. In an apparent change of tone, a media group known for its liberal stance gave the event glowing coverage. (AP/Andy Wong, Pool)

The day after a lavish military parade was held in Beijing on September 3 to mark the 70th anniversary of the end of World War II and China's role in defeating Japan, three major Chinese newspapers--Southern Weekend, Southern Metropolis, and Southern Daily--published pages of photographs and articles brimming with nationalist sentiment. The papers all belong to the Southern Media Group, often called the Southern Series, a state-owned media conglomerate based in Guangdong province. "The Southern Series has opened a new chapter walking on the correct road and developing fast," wrote Xinhua, China's state press agency, in praise of the newspapers' coverage.

Blog   |   Indonesia

Indonesia should pursue justice in 1996 murder of journalist Udin

This past month marked 19 years since Indonesian journalist Fuad Mohammad Syfruddin was murdered. On August 16, 1996, Udin, as he was popularly known, died from injuries he sustained during an attack by unidentified assailants in his home. Udin, a correspondent for the Yogyakarta daily Bernas, had written articles on land disputes and local government corruption.

Blog   |   Bangladesh

Case will test Bangladesh and its commitment to justice for bloggers

Bangladeshi protesters hold torches in a demonstration against the murder of Niloy Neel, the fourth blogger killed in the country this year. (AFP/Munir uz Zaman)

Murder charges filed this week against five suspected Islamist militants in the killing of a Bangladesh blogger give the government a chance to prove it's serious about protecting the nation's bloggers. The formal charges, filed in connection with the March killing of Washiqur Rahman Babu, mark the first time charges have been brought in any of the four blogger slayings so far this year, according to news reports.

Blog   |   India, Security

Amid claims of police beatings during Gujarat clashes, India should step up press protection

A policeman uses a baton to disperse protesters in Gujarat on August 25. Journalists were among those injured as police broke up the crowds. (AP/Ajit Solanki)

Images of police forcibly suppressing protesters, such as the one above, are seen in many places around the world. Too frequently, journalists trying to cover these events find themselves caught in the crosshairs, with news crews beaten by police batons, exposed to teargas or hit by water cannon. From race riots in Ferguson in the U.S. to clashes in India, journalists covering unrest risk finding themselves injured in the violence.

Social Media

View all »