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China

Blog   |   China

Foreign press in China say travel to Tibet remains restricted

While foreign media outlets were granted some limited access to the Tibet Autonomous Region in 2015, China still rejected roughly three-quarters of the reporters who sought permission to visit last year, according to a new survey by the Foreign Correspondents Club of China (FCCC).

April 27, 2016 12:11 PM ET

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Blog   |   China

Foreign press in China face fewer visa delays but obstacles remain, FCCC finds

The results of the Foreign Correspondents' Club of China's annual survey, released at the end of March, are a mixed bag. While problems raised in previous surveys, such as renewing visas, have eased, the responses show challenges remain for the international press.

Blog   |   Canada, China, USA

China's overseas critics under pressure from smear campaigns, cyber attacks

"I think my actions ... have harmed the national interest. What I have done was very wrong. I seriously and earnestly accept to learn a lesson and plead guilty," said Chinese journalist Gao Yu during a televised confession on the state-run channel CCTV in May 2014.

Blog   |   Azerbaijan, China, Iran, Syria, Turkey, Vietnam

On International Women's Day, CPJ recognizes nine female journalists jailed for their work

Syrians protest the killing and torture of women by President Assad's regime in 2011. The blogger Tal al-Mallohi remains in jail in Syria despite a court ordering her release. (AP/Mohammad Hannon)

Coverage of protests and riots. Revelations of official corruption and graft. Major natural disasters. Investigations into deplorable living conditions. These are some of the important issues journalists cover in their role as the Fourth Estate.

Blog   |   China

Read and delete: How Weibo's censors tackle dissent and free speech

The Chinese microblogging site Weibo has a huge following, with around 100 million users posting every day. For those living in China, one of CPJ's 10 most censored countries, the social network offers the chance to discuss and share news that is often blocked in mainstream outlets.

March 3, 2016 8:00 AM ET

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Blog   |   China

The business of censorship: Documents show how Weibo filters sensitive news in China

An advertisement for Weibo in Beijing. The Chinese microblogging site uses a large team of censors to monitor users' posts, a former employee says. (Reuters/China Daily)

When journalists at the Guangdong-based Southern Weekly found that their 2013 new year editorial had been changed, without their knowledge, to exalt the virtues of the Communist Party, they took their outrage to the Chinese microblogging site Weibo.

March 3, 2016 8:00 AM ET

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Blog   |   China

As editor-informant Li Xin disappears, journalists share their experiences with China's security services

Li Xin talks to the AP over Skype in November. The journalist, who says he worked as an informant for Chinese authorities, went missing on January 10. (AP/Saurabh Das)

The case of Li Xin, a journalist who disappeared in Thailand in January after telling the international press in November he had fled China after being forced to work for years as a government informant, has shed light on the pressures some journalists face to provide information to the authorities.

Blog   |   China, Taiwan

We're live from Taipei! Please don't tell China's censors

Tsai Ing-wen, center, declares victory in the presidential election in Taipei on January 16, 2016. (AP/Wally Santana)

Typically, news organizations like to promote original reporting. When an outlet covers a breaking news event at the time and from the place where the event is happening, they want their audience to know. However, for Chinese commercial media that covered this weekend's presidential election in Taiwan, this was apparently not the case.

Blog   |   China

In China, harsh penalties for 'false news' make it harder for reporters to work

China's journalists and bloggers, already under threat of persecution, face new risks from November 1, when amendments to the country's criminal law come into effect. Under the amendment, passed in August by legislative body the National People's Congress, those convicted of spreading false news about disasters or epidemics will face harsh penalties.

October 30, 2015 5:29 PM ET

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Blog   |   China

Cap and trade: How China maintains positive coverage with limit on negative news

President Xi Jinping and his wife join the Obamas at the White House on September 25. The press in China has been issued directives to limit negative reports about the U.S. visit. (AP/Andrew Harnik)

China's President Xi Jinping announced a major cap-and-trade program on carbon emissions at the White House today, but a cap on press freedom back home has long been in place.

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