CPJ Blog

Press Freedom News and Views

China

Blog   |   China

As editor-informant Li Xin disappears, journalists share their experiences with China's security services

Li Xin talks to the AP over Skype in November. The journalist, who says he worked as an informant for Chinese authorities, went missing on January 10. (AP/Saurabh Das)

The case of Li Xin, a journalist who disappeared in Thailand in January after telling the international press in November he had fled China after being forced to work for years as a government informant, has shed light on the pressures some journalists face to provide information to the authorities.

Blog   |   China, Taiwan

We're live from Taipei! Please don't tell China's censors

Tsai Ing-wen, center, declares victory in the presidential election in Taipei on January 16, 2016. (AP/Wally Santana)

Typically, news organizations like to promote original reporting. When an outlet covers a breaking news event at the time and from the place where the event is happening, they want their audience to know. However, for Chinese commercial media that covered this weekend's presidential election in Taiwan, this was apparently not the case.

Blog   |   China

In China, harsh penalties for 'false news' make it harder for reporters to work

China's journalists and bloggers, already under threat of persecution, face new risks from November 1, when amendments to the country's criminal law come into effect. Under the amendment, passed in August by legislative body the National People's Congress, those convicted of spreading false news about disasters or epidemics will face harsh penalties.

October 30, 2015 5:29 PM ET

Tags:

Blog   |   China

Cap and trade: How China maintains positive coverage with limit on negative news

President Xi Jinping and his wife join the Obamas at the White House on September 25. The press in China has been issued directives to limit negative reports about the U.S. visit. (AP/Andrew Harnik)

China's President Xi Jinping announced a major cap-and-trade program on carbon emissions at the White House today, but a cap on press freedom back home has long been in place.

Blog   |   China

Harassment in China: Foreign correspondents' club releases report

From being followed by plain clothes policemen to being locked in a hotel conference room, the life of an international journalist in China comes with its challenges. The Foreign Correspondents' Club of China released details on September 13 of six cases of members being harassed by authorities between March and August this year.

September 17, 2015 1:03 PM ET

Tags:

Blog   |   China

In China, last of the liberals under pressure to toe party line

News crews film as Chinese President Xi Jinping arrives for a military parade in Beijing. In an apparent change of tone, a media group known for its liberal stance gave the event glowing coverage. (AP/Andy Wong, Pool)

The day after a lavish military parade was held in Beijing on September 3 to mark the 70th anniversary of the end of World War II and China's role in defeating Japan, three major Chinese newspapers--Southern Weekend, Southern Metropolis, and Southern Daily--published pages of photographs and articles brimming with nationalist sentiment. The papers all belong to the Southern Media Group, often called the Southern Series, a state-owned media conglomerate based in Guangdong province. "The Southern Series has opened a new chapter walking on the correct road and developing fast," wrote Xinhua, China's state press agency, in praise of the newspapers' coverage.

Blog   |   China

In Hong Kong, Kevin Lau's resiliency reflected in new independent media

Journalists and their supporters gather outside the government headquarters in Hong Kong on March 2, 2014, in support of Kevin Lau. (AP/Vincent Yu)

A Hong Kong court on Friday sentenced two men to 19 years in prison for the attack on journalist Kevin Lau Chun-to. The brutal knifing, of which the mastermind has still not been identified, came at a time when Beijing is increasingly bearing down on the island, and was seen by many as an attack on Hong Kong's freedom of the press. At the same time, Lau himself has noted that Hong Kong's press has a certain resiliency, which most recently can be seen in the emergence of start-up news agencies that aim to provide independent reporting.

Blog   |   China

Q&A: How to cope with perils of being a Chinese news assistant for foreign media

News assistants, or zhongmi (which literally means "Chinese secretaries"), are Chinese citizens working for foreign journalists in China. They play a number of roles including monitoring news leads, conducting research, translating materials, and arranging interviews, as well as acting as cultural liaisons who can explain social and political phenomena to journalists who may not be fluent in Chinese or have not long been in the country. As a former China correspondent for Agence France-Presse told the Asia Society, "Most foreign bureaus would be nothing without their Chinese news assistants."

Blog   |   China

An international call for China to release ailing journalist Gao Yu

Anti-Beijing protesters in Hong Kong demand the release of jailed journalist Gao Yu on July 23. (AP/Kin Cheung)

With the health of jailed journalists Gao Yu fading quickly (see 'I don't want to die here': Gao Yu's health deteriorates in Beijing prison), 15 media support and human rights groups sent a letter today to Chinese President Xi Jinping and other officials calling for the 71-year-old reporter's unconditional release. Gao suffers from heart disease, high blood pressure, and Meniere's disease, which can cause severe dizziness, according to her lawyers. As today's joint letter points out, according to United Nations norms, governments are responsible for maintaining prisoners' health.

August 5, 2015 5:45 PM ET

Tags:

Blog   |   China

'I don't want to die here': Gao Yu's health deteriorates in Beijing prison

Protesters hold up pictures of jailed journalist Gao Yu in Hong Kong in April. Gao's health has deteriorated since she was imprisoned in Beijing. (AP/Kin Cheung)

The lawyer for jailed Chinese journalist Gao Yu says the freelance reporter's health has declined since she was sentenced in April to seven years in prison for leaking state secrets. Shang Baojun, who visited Gao in Beijing No.1 Detention Center on July 28, told CPJ that Gao says she is scared she will die in prison after hearing the results of a health check.

July 29, 2015 5:56 PM ET

Tags:

More documents on China »

Social Media

View all »