CPJ Blog

Press Freedom News and Views

Europe & Central Asia

Blog   |   Serbia

How influence of Russian media risks making Serbia a Moscow bureau

A composite of front pages from Serbia's press. Headlines, from top left: Putin: I Can Destroy the States in Half an Hour; CIA is Warning: Putin is Ready to Wage a War for Serbia; Putin: Give me Crimea, I will Give you Kosovo. From bottom left: Blitzkrieg Campaign: To Kill Putin in Serbs; Serbia is facing an ultimatum: Either Russia or Europe

For a couple of days last month, uninformed tourists visiting Serbia could easily have believed that the country is a Russian outpost. With large photos of Vladimir Putin on their covers, Serbian tabloids--by far the biggest source of print information in the country--were engaged in a discussion over whether the Russian President would defend Serbia and its contested part of Kosovo, or trade it for recognition of Crimea. Added to that were front-page headlines evoking Cold War rhetoric, including the government-controlled Informer's September 20 edition, "Putin: I Can Destroy the States in Half an Hour."

Blog   |   Turkey

CPJ, 25 other organizations call on Turkey to revoke state of emergency

Members of police special forces keep watch from an armored vehicle in front of a courthouse in Ankara, Turkey, on July 18, 2016. (Reuters/Baz Ratner)

A coalition of 26 international media freedom and human rights advocacy groups, including CPJ, today called on Turkey to lift emergency measures that have resulted in the stifling of criticism and dissent; the detention of large numbers of individuals, including more than 100 journalists; and the removal of fair trial protections and safeguards against torture. The statement came in response to Turkey's extension of state of emergency provisions for another 90 days starting today.

October 19, 2016 2:02 PM ET


Blog   |   Turkey

Turkey Crackdown Chronicle: Week of October 16

A demonstrator carrying a carnation to commemorate last year's bombing of a train station in Ankara meets a policeman in riot gear, October 10, 2016. (Reuters/Umit Bektas)

Man accused of shooting at award-winning editor freed pending trial
A court in Istanbul today ordered Murat Şahin--the man accused of attempting to shoot former Cumhuriyet newspaper editor Can Dündar during a break in Dündar's trial on May 6--released pending the conclusion of his trial, Hürriyet Daily News reported.

Blog   |   China, Ivory Coast, Mexico, Pakistan

Protecting journalists who cover corruption is good for the bottom line

Number of journalists who covered corruption who were killed in relation to their work since 1992, by country. (Mehdi Rahmati/CPJ research)

Corruption is one of the most dangerous beats for journalists, and one of the most important for holding those in power to account. There is growing international recognition that corruption is also one of the biggest impediments to poverty reduction and good governance. This is why journalists on this beat must be protected, including by multilateral lending institutions such as the World Bank and International Monetary Fund, which just concluded their annual meetings in Washington D.C.

October 13, 2016 1:34 PM ET


Blog   |   Turkey

Turkey Crackdown Chronicle: Week of October 10

Two columnists freed from jail on appeal

Lale Kemal, a columnist who wrote for the dailies Taraf and Zaman, and Nuriye Akman, a columnist for Zaman, were released from prison yesterday on appeal, the English-language news blog Turkish Minute reported.

Blog   |   Turkey

Turkey Crackdown Chronicle: Week of October 2

News anchor Banu Guven (L) gets ready for a news broadcast at a studio of IMC TV, a news broadcaster slated for closure, in Istanbul, Turkey, September 30, 2016. (Reuters/Huseyin Aldemir)

Reporter arraigned on terrorism charges for Facebook posts
The Mersin Court of Penal Peace last night arraigned Cemil Uğur, a reporter for the left-wing Evrensel newspaper, on charges of "being member of a [terrorist] organization," and "propagandizing for a [terrorist] organization," his employer reported. Police held Uğur for 16 days in August, before a court ordered him released on probation on September 7. The court in the southern city of Mersin based its order to jail him pending trial on posts to the journalist's Facebook account. The journalist denies the charges and says the posts in question were published when his account was hacked.

Blog   |   Turkey

Turkey Crackdown Chronicle: Week of September 25

In this July 21, 2016, file photo, a merchant reads the newspaper in Istanbul. (AP/Petros Giannakouris)

Reporter arraigned on terrorism charges for having app on phone
A court in the southern Turkish city of Isparta on September 24 arraigned Ramazan Alkan, a reporter for the pro-government, Islamist daily Yeni Akit on terrorism charges for having an app on his phone authorities believe followers of exiled preacher Fethullah Gülen use to communicate with each other in secret, his employer reported today. The Turkish government accuses Gülen of leading a terrorist organization and "parallel state structure" within Turkey that it blames for a July 15 failed military coup. Gülen denies any role in the attempted coup.

Blog   |   Montenegro

CPJ joins call for Montenegro to free imprisoned journalist Jovo Martinović

Freelance journalist Jovo Martinović has been in pretrial detention for 11 months. (Martinovic family)

The Committee to Protect Journalists, along with the Human Rights Watch and Reporters Without Borders, today wrote a joint letter to Montenegrin Prime Minister Milo Đukanović protesting the 11-month pretrial detention of freelance journalist Jovo Martinović, who has been accused of participating in a drug trafficking ring--an accusation he has denied and which the prosecution has failed to substantiate with evidence.

September 19, 2016 11:51 AM ET


Blog   |   Turkey

Turkey Crackdown Chronicle: Week of September 18

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan speaks at the G20 summit in Gangzhou, China, September 5, 2016. (Reuters/Damir Salgoj)

Taraf chief editor detained hours after release

Hours after his release from prison, the writer and journalist Ahmet Altan was detained again. Altan turned himself in late last night and was arrested after hearing that he was wanted by authorities, according to reports. According to a report in the daily, Hürriyet, the prosecution objected to Altan's release under judicial control and argued that as the founding chief editor of the daily, Taraf, the journalist was a part of the FETÖ/PDY organization. The court ordered the journalist to be detained again under accusations of "attempting to eliminate the government of the Republic of Turkey or to prevent it from its duties" and "being member of a [terrorist] organization." Despite some pro-government media reports on Altan being detained while on the run, other reports and accounts on social media said the journalist turned himself in. Both Altan brothers, Ahmet and Mehmet are at Silivri Prison in Istanbul, pending trial

Blog   |   Turkey

CPJ testifies on Turkey's press freedom record after failed coup attempt

Turkish journalist Can Dündar and his wife, Dilek, who had her passport confiscated in September. (Reuters/Osman Orsal)

CPJ Europe and Central Asia Program Coordinator Nina Ognianova today testified before the Europe, Eurasia, and Emerging Threats Subcommittee of the U.S. House Foreign Affairs Committee, at the hearing, "Turkey after the July Coup Attempt."

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