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Blog   |   Security

CPJ joins call for UN to appoint special representative for safety of journalists

The Committee to Protect Journalists is one of 35 press freedom groups calling on the U.N. General Assembly to appoint a Special Representative of the U.N. Secretary General for the Safety of Journalists as soon as possible. A joint letter from the groups proposes that the representative could work closely with the secretary-general to coordinate with U.N. bodies and member states to implement the U.N. Plan of Action on the Safety of Journalists and the Issue of Impunity.

April 29, 2016 3:56 PM ET

Blog   |   Security

Kidnapping for profit or propaganda: How hostage risk for journalists is on the rise

From Central America to North Africa, kidnappings are on the rise and journalists are among the groups at risk of being abducted. Adding to the challenges of dealing with a hostage situation is a lack of solid information about kidnappings worldwide, or a united international response in dealing with the demands of kidnap groups.

Blog   |   Internet, Security

Three simple steps to protect shared Twitter accounts from hackers

Artwork at Twitter's Santa Monica office. Teams managing shared Twitter accounts can still make use of the site's two-factor authentication protection. (AFP/Jonathan Alcorn)

In my previous blog post I reviewed the results of a poll asking journalists if they used two-factor authentication to protect Twitter accounts from being hacked. But the importance of robust security isn't limited to personal Twitter accounts.

March 28, 2016 3:30 PM ET

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Blog   |   Internet, Security

'What's two-factor?' How journalists can protect themselves from Twitter hacks

The Twitter logo is reflected on a pillar in the New York Stock Exchange. A CPJ poll of the site's users found many did not know how to secure their accounts. (AP/Richard Drew, File)

When The Associated Press's verified @AP account was hacked three years ago, CPJ's senior security adviser Frank Smyth and I noted that for individuals faced with that situation, the best course of action is to request a password reset, tweet at Twitter staff, and pray. The best advice is still to not get hacked in the first place.

March 23, 2016 4:52 PM ET

Blog   |   Internet, Security

Computer security is necessary for journalist safety

EDITOR'S NOTE: This article was originally published, in Spanish, in El País.

This week, journalists, technologists, and other human rights advocates will gather in Valencia, Spain for the Internet Freedom Festival, a multidisciplinary "un-conference" dedicated to fighting surveillance and censorship online. More than 600 people from 43 countries have registered for the festival, which is now in its second year. The gathering could not come at a more important time.

Blog   |   Security, USA

Journalist groups urge Kerry to make good on media safety pledges

The Islamic State beheadings of journalists shook up the media industry. The safety of reporters generally and conditions for freelancers in particular became a news story. Politicians responded.

Blog   |   Internet, Security, USA

Save Crypto: CPJ joins call for Obama to back strong encryption

The Committee to Protect Journalists has signed a petition organized by digital rights groups Access and the Electronic Frontier Foundation, urging President Barack Obama to publicly commit the U.S. to a policy of supporting strong encryption. Since the Save Crypto petition's launch on September 29, it has gathered nearly 18,000 signatures, including about 30 from press freedom and digital rights groups.

October 2, 2015 5:12 PM ET

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Blog   |   Internet, Security

Flaws discovered in TrueCrypt, but journalists still have options for encryption

Project Zero, a Google team that searches for bugs, has identified two flaws affecting the TrueCrypt disk encryption software program. While the flaws, which were found by computer security researcher James Forshaw, are not cryptographic--meaning they couldn't be used directly to decrypt a disk or device--they present potential problems for user security.

October 2, 2015 3:01 PM ET

Blog   |   Internet, Security, USA

Has White House finally got the message about strong encryption? Welcome shift seen in speeches and policy memo

The west wing of the White House in July. The Obama administration is debating whether to support stronger encryption. (Geoffrey King/CPJ)

Yesterday, during a panel on encryption policy hosted by Just Security, an online forum covering national security law and policy, top U.S. intelligence lawyer Robert S. Litt pressed the case for engineering backdoors in encryption without undermining computer security as a whole. As CPJ has documented, leading security and policy experts consider this impossible.

Blog   |   Security, Turkey

Don't Forget Rasool: In international reporting, local journalists often suffer

When two journalists from VICE, Jake Hanrahan and Philip Pendlebury, were arrested with Iraqi journalist Mohammed Ismael Rasool on August 28, a familiar scenario unfolded. A week later, Hanrahan and Pendlebury were released following a media flurry and worldwide attention. Still behind bars is Rasool, an experienced journalist and translator who had worked extensively in the Middle East for the Associated Press, Al-Jazeera, and VICE.

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