Europe & Central Asia

2013

Attacks on the Press   |   Belarus

Attacks on the Press in 2012: Belarus

President Aleksandr Lukashenko presided over one of the world's most censored nations, continuing policies that sought to suffocate critical journalism and dissenting opinion. At least four reporters, all of them known for critical coverage, were barred from traveling outside the country in March. Another four reporters were jailed during the year, while numerous others faced threats, harassment, fines, and assaults. The government's repressive practices were illustrated by its harsh reaction to a Swedish ad agency stunt in which hundreds of teddy bears pinned with press freedom slogans were airdropped over the country. The KGB jailed one reporter who covered the stunt, and interrogated and fined two others who published photos and stories about the airdrop. The episode led to the sacking of top army generals and a foreign minister, along with the expulsion of the Swedish ambassador. The country grew increasingly isolated during the year. In February, the government expelled Polish and European Union ambassadors after the EU widened travel bans against Belarusian officials due to the country's human rights failures. Lukashenko himself was subjected to an embarrassing travel restriction: He was barred from the 2012 Olympic Games in London because of an EU travel ban imposed after Minsk harshly cracked down on election protests in December 2010. In September 2012, the country's parliamentary election was marred by reports that election officials obstructed opposition candidates seeking to register, that state-controlled media refused to grant opposition candidates equitable coverage, and that the KGB cracked down on online activists. Throughout the year, critical media--both local and international--faced domestic blocking online, denial of accreditation, and distribution hurdles.

February 14, 2013 12:05 AM ET

Attacks on the Press   |   Azerbaijan

Attacks on the Press in 2012: Azerbaijan

Baku viciously cracked down on domestic dissent as it hosted two major international events, the Eurovision 2012 song contest and the Internet Governance Forum. Authorities imprisoned at least nine critical journalists on a variety of retaliatory charges, including hooliganism, drug possession, and extortion. CPJ concluded that the charges were fabricated. International human rights groups, including CPJ, criticized the Eurovision organizer, the European Broadcasting Union, for standing by passively as President Ilham Aliyev’s government jailed and intimidated detractors. The broadcasting union, while expressing concern about the abuses, said the contest was an “apolitical” event. Several independent journalists, including award-winning reporter Idrak Abbasov, were brutally assaulted on assignment, but the assailants, believed to have included police and security officers, enjoyed impunity. Investigative journalist Khadija Ismailova was subjected to a contemptible intimidation campaign after reporting on the ruling family’s extensive business interests. State media smeared her reputation, and anonymous individuals circulated intimate videos and photos. Parliament responded to Ismailova’s coverage by passing legislation giving the president broad immunity from prosecution and barring corporations from disclosing a wide range of financial information. Aliyev signed the bills into law in July.

February 14, 2013 12:05 AM ET

Attacks on the Press

Attacks on the Press in 2012: Europe & Central Asia

Analyses and data track press freedom conditions. Elisabeth Witchel recounts a mother's anguished pursuit of justice in Russia. Nina Ognianova and Kristin Jones examine the implications of repressive nations hosting the Olympics. And Jean-Paul Marthoz reveals the censorship imposed by religious extremists.

February 14, 2013 12:05 AM ET

Attacks on the Press   |   Azerbaijan, China, Cuba, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Iran, Kyrgyzstan, Myanmar, Saudi Arabia, Syria, Turkey, Uzbekistan, Vietnam

Attacks on the Press: Prison Census 2012: A Worldwide Roundup

Worldwide tally reaches highest point since CPJ began surveys in 1990. Governments use charges of terrorism, other anti-state offenses to silence critical voices. Turkey is the world's worst jailer. A CPJ special report

Attacks on the Press   |   Brazil, China, Kyrgyzstan, Liberia, Paraguay

Attacks on the Press: The Power of the Ordinary

Who is allowed to talk? What are they allowed to say? Award winners seek the answers. By Kristin Jones

(AFP/Michael Nagle)

Attacks on the Press   |   Algeria, Egypt, Ethiopia, Mali, Nigeria, Saudi Arabia, Somalia, Tajikistan, Tunisia

Attacks on the Press: Journalism and Religion

Editors think twice, reporters do not dig deeply, columnists choose words carefully. By Jean-Paul Marthoz

(AFP/Brian Rasmussen)

Attacks on the Press   |   Brazil, Colombia, El Salvador, Honduras, Mali, Turkey

Attacks on the Press: Divided, Journalists Are at Risk

No amount of security training can make up for a lack of professional solidarity. By Frank Smyth

(AFP/Orlando Sierra)

Attacks on the Press   |   Iraq, Ivory Coast, Mexico, Russia, Sri Lanka

Attacks on the Press: Missing

Police never bothered to look for cartoonist Prageeth Eknelygoda. It's not unusual. By María Salazar-Ferro

(AFP/Lakruwan Wannirachchi)

Attacks on the Press   |   Brazil, Ecuador, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Iran, North Korea, Pakistan, Russia, Somalia, Syria, Turkey, Vietnam

Attacks on the Press: CPJ Risk List

From conflict-ridden Syria to aspiring world leader Brazil, 10 nations on a downslope. By Karen Phillips

(Reuters/Enrique Marcarian)

2013

Pages: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 or all
« Previous Page   Next Page »
« 2012 | 2014 »