Media Advisories   |   Brazil, China, Kyrgyzstan, Liberia

Honoring tenacity and courage

New York, November 13, 2012-- Four fearless journalists from Brazil, China, Kyrgyzstan and Liberia who risked their lives and liberty to expose wrongdoings will be awarded the Committee to Protect Journalists' 2012 International Press Freedom Awards, an annual recognition of courageous reporting.  Harassed, tortured, threatened and imprisoned for their critical investigations, the awardees have endured reprisals for their work and continue to persevere.   The awards dinner is open for press coverage. Accreditation requests will be accepted until noon on November 19 (EST).

November 13, 2012 10:31 AM ET


Letters   |   Kyrgyzstan

CPJ urges Kyrgyzstan to release Azimjon Askarov

Dear President Atambayev: The Committee to Protect Journalists is writing to bring to your attention a new report we have issued on Azimjon Askarov, an investigative journalist and human rights defender who was sentenced in September 2010 to life in prison. CPJ's review of Askarov's case, outlined in the attached report, has found that his probe and trial were marred by numerous procedural violations, including his torture in custody and the lack of any evidence implicating him in criminal activity.

Attacks on the Press   |   Kyrgyzstan

Attacks on the Press in 2011: Kyrgyzstan

As President Roza Otunbayeva declared her commitment to press freedom, parliament decriminalized libel, eliminating a tool used by authorities in the past to suppress critical journalism. But rising violence, censorship, and politically motivated prosecutions marred the year in Kyrgyzstan. Parliament ordered state agencies to block domestic access to the critical website Fergana News, although the order was not immediately implemented. Ahead of the October 30 presidential vote won by Almazbek Atambayev, legislators ordered domestic broadcasters to screen foreign-produced programming and remove content that could insult the candidates. An investigative commission under the auspices of the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe found Kyrgyz authorities complicit in the ethnic conflict that gripped the south in June 2010. The conflict continued to cast a dark shadow over press freedom. Authorities brought trumped-up extremism charges against two ethnic Uzbek media owners, who went into exile after being compelled to give up their news assets. Another ethnic Uzbek journalist, Azimjon Askarov, was serving a life prison term on fabricated charges despite international calls for his release. Legislators banned local media from publishing images of the conflict on its anniversary.

February 21, 2012 12:52 AM ET
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