Iran

Drawing the line: Cartoonists under threat

While the danger faced by cartoonists is brought into focus by the attack on French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, the threats far exceed Islamic extremism. A CPJ special report finds that as their work transcends borders and languages and simplifies complex political situations, cartoonists around the world are being imprisoned, forced into hiding, threatened with legal action or killed. In Malaysia, political cartoonist Zunar, pictured, could face decades in prison for his work.

Slideshow: Cartoonists share their work
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(AP/Joshua Paul)

Case   |   Iran

In Iran, journalists accused of espionage, sentenced to prison

Iranian government-run media outlets in mid-August 2015 accused Farnaz Fassihi, a New York-based senior reporter for the Wall Street Journal, of being a liaison between the U.S. government and the opposition. After Kayhan, a newspaper closely associated with the Iran's Supreme Leader Ayatollah Khamenei, accused Fassihi of conspiring against the Iranian government, the Supreme Leader-affiliated newspaper Resalat and Tasnim, a news agency closely associated with Iran's Revolutionary Guard Corps, followed suit with similar claims.

Press Releases   |   Iran

CPJ board urges Iran's leaders to intervene in case of jailed Washington Post reporter

Letter marks one year behind bars for Jason Rezaian

New York, July 20, 2015--Thirty-four members of the Committee to Protect Journalists' board of directors today sent a letter urging the head of the Iranian judiciary, Ayatollah Sadeq Larijani, to intervene in the case of jailed Washington Post reporter Jason Rezaian. The letter comes on the eve of the one-year anniversary of Rezaian's arrest on July 22, 2014.

July 20, 2015 5:27 PM ET

Letters   |   Iran

CPJ board urges Iran's leaders to intervene in case of Jason Rezaian

Dear Ayatollah Sadeq Larijani: On the one-year anniversary of the arrest of Washington Post reporter Jason Rezaian, members of the Committee to Protect Journalists' board of directors today sent a letter urging the head of the Iranian judiciary, Ayatollah Sadeq Larijani, to intervene in the case of jailed Washington Post reporter Jason Rezaian.

Statements   |   Iran

Iran must respect transparency in Jason Rezaian trial

New York, May 22, 2015--The Committee to Protect Journalists calls on Iran to ensure a fair and transparent trial for Washington Post correspondent Jason Rezaian, and to allow the reporter's defense team and employer access to court proceedings. Rezaian, who has been held in jail since July 2014, is due to appear in court in Tehran on May 26, according to reports.

May 22, 2015 12:19 PM ET

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Reports   |   Bangladesh, Denmark, Ecuador, France, India, Iran, Malaysia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Syria, USA, Venezuela

Drawing the line: Cartoonists under threat

On January 7, two gunmen burst into the offices of French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, killing eight journalists and bringing into focus the risks cartoonists face. But with the ability of their work to transcend borders and languages, and to simplify complex political situations, the threats faced by cartoonists around the world—who are being imprisoned, forced into hiding, threatened with legal action or killed—far exceed Islamic extremism. A Committee to Protect Journalists special report by Shawn W. Crispin

Impact   |   Azerbaijan, Bahrain, China, Cuba, Egypt, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Iran, Latvia, Myanmar, North Korea, Saudi Arabia, Vietnam

News from the Committee to Protect Journalists, April 2015

CPJ launches annual publication Attacks on the Press


At a U.N. press conference on April 27 to launch CPJ's annual publication Attacks on the Press, CPJ Executive Director Joel Simon called on the U.N. Security Council to include in its May 27 debate on Journalist Safety a warning to states that they should not use national security as an excuse to jail, harass, or censor journalists.

The last three years have been the most deadly for the press, according to CPJ research. One of the reasons is the developing "terror dynamic"--non-state actors targeting journalists with violence while governments restrict civil liberties and press freedom in response. This phenomenon was amply documented in essays published in this year's edition of Attacks on the Press.

The book, which emphasizes reporting and analysis by CPJ staff and outside experts, features essays on multiple threats facing the press: the conflict in Syria, where freelancers and local journalists must adapt to an environment in which they are targets; terror and criminal groups, in countries as Syria, Nigeria, and Mexico, which document their own atrocities and disseminate them through social media; and crackdowns on the press in Ethiopia and Egypt, where governments use the threat of terror to justify repression. Several essays in the book also look at the impact of surveillance in more democratic societies, including those in Europe. The book also includes CPJ's list of the 10 Most Censored Countries.

The print edition of Attacks on the Press is published by Bloomberg Press, an imprint of Wiley, and is available for purchase.

May 7, 2015 4:24 PM ET

Attacks on the Press   |   China, Cuba, Eritrea, Hungary, Iran, Poland, South Africa, Sudan, Syria, Vietnam

Journalists overcome obstacles through crowdfunding and determination

The rubble of a school bombed by the Sudanese government in 2012. To set up a news agency to cover the conflict, humanitarian worker Ryan Boyette used crowdfunding. (AP/Ryan Boyette)

During South Africa's Boer War, at the turn of the 20th century, a determined news organization relocated reporters, copy editors, and printing presses to the front line to ensure accurate reporting. In the Warsaw Ghetto, during World War II, a literal underground press, established to counter Nazi propaganda, required the nightly movement of cumbersome printing equipment to evade capture.

Statements   |   Iran

CPJ condemns Iran's espionage charges against Jason Rezaian

New York, April 20, 2015--CPJ is alarmed by reports of official charges levied against Washington Post Tehran bureau chief Jason Rezaian. The charges included espionage, "collaborating with hostile governments," "propaganda against the establishment," and allegations that he gathered information "about internal and foreign policy," the Post reported today. His case file presents no evidence to justify the charges, according to a statement from Rezaian's lawyer Leila Ahsan, the Post reported.

April 20, 2015 12:53 PM ET

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Blog   |   Iran

CPJ joins call to renew mandate of human rights rapporteur in Iran

The Committee to Protect Journalists, along with 35 human rights groups, today joined a call for member states of the U.N. Human Rights Council to renew the mandate of the Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights in Iran at the council's 28th session.

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