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Reports   |   Cuba

Connecting Cuba

About this report

September 28, 2016 9:00 AM ET

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Reports   |   Cuba

Connecting Cuba

Executive Summary: Cuba’s media vitally transformed but cautious approach is slowing progress

By Carlos Lauría

A lively blogosphere, an increasing number of news websites carrying investigative reporting and news commentary, and an innovative breed of independent reporters who are critical of, yet still support socialist ideas have vitally transformed Cuba’s media landscape in the past five years.

Reports   |   Cuba

Connecting Cuba

Cuba’s evolving news agenda

At the Argos Theatre in Havana, Yenys Laura Prieto Velazco purchased a ticket for Diez Millones, a popular play about a Cuban family torn apart by the ideological fanaticism of the Cuban revolution and by the father’s departure to the U.S. during the 1980 Mariel boatlift.

Reports   |   Cuba

Connecting Cuba

Staying connected in an offline world

By Alexandra Ellerbeck

For Elaine Díaz Rodríguez, founder of Periodismo de Barrio, internet access in poorly connected Cuba comes at a premium. “Our reporters have less than 10 hours a month of internet access,” she told CPJ during the Latin American Studies Association conference in New York, where she was taking advantage of the hotel Wi-Fi. “Between midnight and 3 a.m. every night, I download information off the internet. It’s already part of the professional culture to bring a flash drive back to Cuba.”

Reports   |   Cuba

Connecting Cuba

Recommendations

The Committee to Protect Journalists offers the following recommendations:

September 28, 2016 9:00 AM ET

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Alerts   |   Jordan

Jordanian commentator Nahed Hattar shot to death in Jordan

Washington, September 25, 2016--The Committee to Protect Journalists condemns today's assassination of controversial Jordanian writer Nahed Hattar outside an Amman court, where he was facing charges of "insulting religion" in connection with a cartoon he shared on Facebook, according to news reports. Relatives at the scene apprehended his killer, the reports said.

Alerts   |   Internet, Pakistan

Pakistani law could enable sweeping internet censorship

A man browses the internet at a cafe in Rawalpindi, Pakistan, in this September 18, 2013 file photo. (Reuters/Faisal Mahmood)

Bangkok, August 26, 2016 - Pakistani President Mamnoon Hussain should veto a bill that could allow for sweeping censorship of the internet and the prosecution of journalists, the Committee to Protect Journalists said today. Pakistan's National Assembly approved the Prevention of Electronic Crimes Bill 2015 last week and sent it to Hussain to sign into law, according to press reports.

August 26, 2016 11:57 AM ET

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Alerts   |   India

Indian authorities shut down media outlets in Jammu and Kashmir

In this July 16 photo, Kashmiri journalists protest against the government in Srinagar, Indian-controlled Kashmir, where authorities have shut down printing presses and banned newspapers after days of anti-India protests.(AP/Mukhtar Khan)

Washington, July 18, 2016--The Committee to Protect Journalists calls on authorities in the northern Indian state of Jammu and Kashmir to stop harassing and obstructing the media. Several newspapers in the state have been prevented from publishing for three days, while mobile internet services are shut down, and cable television has been blocked.

Blog   |   China

China's information and internet controls will only tighten under Xu Lin

Chinese President Xi Jinping, center, talks with Facebook Chief Executive Mark Zuckerberg, right, as Lu Wei, left, China's Internet czar, looks on at Microsoft's main campus in Redmond, Washington, on September 23, 2015. Lu Wei left the Cyberspace Administration of China at the end of June. (AP/Ted S. Warren)

When the new director of the Cyberspace Administration of China, Xu Lin, issued on July 3 a warning that websites not report unverified content drawn from social media without facing possible punishment, it was clear that Beijing would move quickly beyond the Lu Wei era of information control. The announcement demanded that news websites provide "correct guidance for public opinion"--correct, clearly, in the eyes of the Cyberspace Administration, and ultimately the Chinese Communist Party. The warnings suggest that the harsh controls implemented by Lu could become even more severe.

Blog   |   China

In China, more journalists--even former ones--vulnerable to government wrath

A picture of Chinese President Xi Jinping is seen behind People's Liberation Army soldiers in Beijing on August 22, 2015. (Reuters/Damir Sagolj)

Most of the journalists imprisoned in China reported or commented on issues that the Chinese government finds threatening to its rule. They were likely aware that their work could invoke the wrath of the Chinese Communist Party at any time, but still choose to go ahead for the sake of truth and the public interest. Other journalists choose to stay away from the political red lines, writing and speaking within the realm of what is believed to be allowed--and they have generally been spared persecution. However, such certainty has increasingly eroded. Since Xi Jinping assumed the presidency in 2013, more and more journalists are vulnerable.

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