Press Law

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Blog   |   Tanzania

Tanzania's press wait to see if new president will reform troubling media laws

Tanzania's new president, John Pombe Magufuli, right, and outgoing president, Jakaya Kikwete. Several of the country's journalists say they hope Magufuli will reform repressive press laws. (Reuters/Emmanuel Herman)

Elections in Tanzania passed smoothly in October, but several local journalists and a media lawyer told me the spectre of anti-press laws is casting a pall over critical reporting in the country and that hopes for legal reform under the newly elected President John Pombe Magufuli remain muted.

December 15, 2015 12:48 PM ET

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Blog   |   Argentina

How Argentine broadcast law rewards friendly outlets and discriminates against critics

Presidential candidate Daniel Scioli is surrounded by press on election day. A pro-government TV station erroneously declared him the winner despite the vote going to a runoff in late November. (AP/Enric Marti)

The moment polls closed for Argentina's presidential election on October 25, the C5N cable news station breathlessly reported that ruling party candidate Daniel Scioli had triumphed and would succeed President Cristina Fernández de Kirchner, who is banned by the constitution from running for a third consecutive term.

Alerts   |   Ivory Coast

Ivory Coast publisher charged with defamation, insult

Joseph Titi spent almost a week in prison before being released and charged with defamation, insult, and publishing false news. (CPJ)

Abidjan, August 5, 2015--A journalist who was imprisoned for almost a week by authorities in the Ivory Coast has been charged with defamation, among other crimes, according to the journalist and news reports. The Committee to Protect Journalists calls on authorities in the Ivory Coast to drop the charges against Joseph Titi immediately.

A judge in the capital, Abidjan, charged Titi on Monday with defamation, insulting the president and a foreign head of state, and publishing false information, Titi told CPJ. The journalist was detained on July 29 and was released on Tuesday after being charged. Titi said he was released from prison because the charges fall under the country's Press Law, which excludes imprisonment for the offenses. If convicted, Titi faces a fine of between 10,000,000 and 20,000,000 CFA francs (US$17,000-US$34,000) under the law.

Blog   |   Indonesia

Media restrictions in Papua underscore Indonesia's wider problems

A rally in Jakarta for the Free Papua Movement. Restricted media access to the Indonesian region has left the ongoing fight for secession under reported. (Reuters/Pius Erlangga)

With more than 50 years of restricted media access, one of the least covered armed conflicts in the world is the long-simmering struggle between Indonesia's military and the secessionist Free Papua Movement. Under Indonesia's seven successive post-independence governments--the early ones led by autocratic strongmen, the recent ones more or less democratically elected--the world has been deprived of details of the persistent low-intensity battle for autonomy playing out in the Papuan provinces.

Blog   |   Burundi

Press law debate and journalist's release signal hope for Burundi's media

Supporters of Radio Publique Africaine director Bob Rugurika crowd around the station's offices to celebrate his release on bail last month. Rugurika's release comes as Burundi debates an easing of press laws. (AFP/Esdras Ndikumana)

Burundi journalists may have more space to report freely ahead of the country's controversial elections this year after the legislative assembly pushed for amendments to a draconian press law and a radio director was released on bail.

Blog   |   Sudan

Sudan passes freedom of information law but journalists remain wary

A newspaper kiosk in Khartoum. Journalists in Sudan are cautious about the freedom of information law recently passed in parliament. (AFP/Ashraf Shazly)

The Sudanese government has boasted that its freedom of information law, passed by parliament at the end of January, will increase transparency by giving citizens the right to access and publish public information. But with a long history of censorship and harassment from authorities, journalists suspect the law will be used as another way to suppress them.

Turkey imposes ban on media coverage of Iraq hostage crisis

Istanbul, June 18, 2014--The Committee to Protect Journalists is alarmed by a Turkish court's decision on Monday to censor media coverage of a hostage crisis in the Iraqi city of Mosul. Last week, insurgents led by the Al-Qaeda splinter group Islamic State in Iraq and Sham abducted at least 80 Turkish citizens, including 49 consulate staff and their families, according to news reports.

Alerts   |   Israel and the Occupied Palestinian Territory, Lebanon, Syria

Lebanon should overturn conviction of journalist

New York, December 12, 2013--The Committee to Protect Journalists calls on the Lebanese Court of Cassation to overturn the conviction of Rami Aysha, a Lebanese-Palestinian freelance journalist charged with purchasing firearms while he was investigating arms trafficking from Lebanon to Syria.

Blog   |   Kenya

Just the fear of draconian press laws is enough

Kenyan journalists' protests in 2007 warded off a new media law. (AP)

Few in Kenya's media could comprehend how a media bill, considered the most repressive in Kenya's 50-year history, could sail so easily through Parliament last week. Fittingly, Parliament passed the Kenya Information and Communications Amendment Bill on Halloween. It is awaiting President Uhuru Kenyatta's signature following a 14- day deliberation period.

November 5, 2013 3:29 PM ET

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